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Fresh Steadicam Op Footage


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#1 KinoKamera

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 07:29 AM

Hi guys,

I am relatively fresh steadicam op, and have recently put together my reel. I need some feedback, so if any of you have a minute it would be greatly appreciated...

George Lekovic



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#2 Charles Papert

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 11:14 AM

Hi George:

For a newbie, you have quite a few different projects on your reel! How long have you been operating, how long have you had your rig?

I'm going to try a different approach here than I usually do when asked for feedback on a reel. How do YOU feel about it? What do you think are your strengths/weaknesses? What do you think you need to work on?

best,
Chas
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#3 Ari Gertler

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 12:28 PM

where can I view your Reel?

Ari Gertler
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#4 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 01:24 PM

Chas,

An Interesting approach! And here I was, ready to give him a bunch of feedback. Guess I should wait....

George,

I noticed you are in NYC (I think I saw your name in the credits of a short film during the Fusion film festival a few weeks back). If I can be of any help, let me know. All my info is on my web site.

Cheers,
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#5 David George Ellis

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 02:03 PM

where can I view your Reel?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Click on the KinoKamera link below George's post. Interesting approach indeed. Even more interesting was your operating stance during your credits sequence. I watched those last seconds over and over to get an idea of how you do your do. George, I would like to know how you feel about the rig positioned that way in reference to your body. That may open more doors to help you explain.

ONE,
David


P.S. I like this "sensitve" approach to giving feedback. Like two milk-heavy bosoms welcoming an infant to suckle through the sense of touch and comfort. Great idea, Chas!!!
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#6 LeighWanstead

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 04:29 PM

Hi George,

What is your steadicam set-up? steadicam ultra? Have you been to the workshop everyone suggested?

I just watched first several seconds of your demo reel STEADIHIGH.MOV and I feel the video not horizontal and I think that you put too much force on holding the post.

Regards
Leigh
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#7 LeighWanstead

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 04:30 PM

where can I view your Reel?

Ari Gertler

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Just click the blue word "KinoKamera" in his post and you will be directed to his website.

Regards
Leigh
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#8 thomas-english

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 06:36 PM

How do you feel about your horizons? Whilst you may have thoughts about the latter ones, sometimes I think slight loss of horizons can work quite well (notably the opening sequence).

The more I operate, the more I realize that there s a lot more to operating than just holding a flat horizon the whole time.

How do you feel about your headrooms in DonJuan? I think I can tell when you have changed (round the rig into DonJuan) by the headrooms

There was a sequence of posts a little while ago about controlling headroom in Don Juan on green screen monitors and how the plastic casing give you a false image with regards to headroom (check the archives). Maybe this is of help, what do you think?
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#9 LeighWanstead

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 09:58 PM

How do you feel about your horizons? Whilst you may have thoughts about the latter ones, sometimes I think slight loss of horizons can work quite well (notably the opening sequence).

The more I operate, the more I realize that there s a lot more to operating than just holding a flat horizon the whole time.


Hi thomas,

My understanding is if the operator want it to be flat horizon, then the result should be flat horizon. If operator want it slight loss of horizons, then end result should be slight loss of horizons. For beginer, most likely the operator will want to get flat horizons, but the end result video footage is not flat horizons.

What you said is one step further once reach the control of rig at will. ;-)

Regards
Leigh
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#10 jay kilroy

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 10:45 PM

[quote name='LeighWanstead' date='Apr 26 2005, 06:58 PM']

[quote name='thomas-english' date='Apr 26 2005, 03:36 PM']
Hi thomas,

My understanding is if the operator want it to be flat horizon, then the result should be flat horizon. If operator want it slight loss of horizons, then end result should be slight loss of horizons. For beginer, most likely the operator will want to get flat horizons, but the end result video footage is not flat horizons.

What you said is one step further once reach the control of rig at will. ;-)

Regards
Leigh

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

[/quote]


If the DIRECTOR wants a flat horizon then the operator better GIVE the director a flat horizon! :angry:


jay kilroy
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#11 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 12:53 AM

Hopefully this will not be taken wrong, BUT...


I think that there are people more qualified to answer this thread Leigh. Until you take a workshop and learn how to approach operating issues you might be better served taking the advice rather then giving it.
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#12 thomas-english

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 05:47 AM

Maybe you missunderstood me Jay, off course if the director wants a flat horizon, it should be painlessly delivered. The ability to keep a horizon flat is so elementary to steadicam it should be taken for absolute granted.

I have been in situations however when delivering a flat horizon on the first couple of takes has not gotten me the smile from the director I like. He has come out with some garble (as they do) and ive taken a much more unconstrained approach, without keeping horizons, letting them subtly rotate over freely (smoothly, without that corrected look) with the dynamic of the shot and this has gotten me the smile I desire. Admitadly this is subtle rather than overt scenary horizons, but nevertheless.

All I can say really is I like to practise my handheld as well in real shoot situations and remember that a steadicam is not just a dolly, it can do much much more not just in movement.

And its an art! If you prefer it to look one way offer it up and forget the rules of good and bad steadicam...... but master good steadicam first, I feel I will always be learning. And sure I might be wrong now and completely disagree with myself in a few years.

What I hate the most, absolutely hate is when they "go dutch" on regular television. Anything over 20 degrees, anything with no shot dynamic to "explain it" , anything where they hold the camera at an angle just to "add funky ness" to the shot.... I hate it! But hey, maybe if I had been working for mtv in the mid eighties and had been part of that culture, I would have been dutch boy! and loved it.....

Why is it called "going dutch" anyway?
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#13 JobScholtze

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 07:01 AM

Why is it called "going dutch" anyway?


Thats what i like to know too :D What i know about it is this,

When we ( dutch ) go to the states, say New York, we are always impressed by the high buildings and shoot them from the ground way up, and there it is, dutch angle :D
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#14 thomas-english

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 07:58 AM

maybe its because you all live on boats and barges? So you like the horizon thing!
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#15 David George Ellis

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 08:12 AM

Why is it called "going dutch" anyway?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Gerard Houckegeest was a painter of imaginary church interiors and Renaissance buildings. His first known depiction of an actual Church interior is his "New Church" in Delft... In the "New Church" Houckgeest shifts his position to the side to give an angle of 45 degrees to the priciple axis.

I'm guessing there was a movement in Dutch art where paintings were given this new perspective that eventually was adopted by the filmmaking community to create a new dynamic so we could have really cool disorienting shots to make Adam West's Batman seem more energetic.

I feel the "bosom" approach has failed, George. We patiently wait for your personal feedback.

David
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