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Which model for a stripped RED Scarlet?


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#1 Michael Solomon

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:47 PM

Hey guys,

I could use your help. I'm now a part owner on a RED Scarlet package. I typically DP and rent myself out along with the package.

Right now, whenever I need a steadicam op, I almost always hire a professional one separately. Especially on bigger gigs where clients have the budget. I have no aspirations to steadicam op myself full time and don't profess to be that great at it.

With that said, I'm looking for a steadicam rig that can fly a stripped down RED Scarlet. This is purely for low/no-budget favor shoots and just something that I can play and have fun with. It would be flying the scarlet, redvolt in side handle, SSD drive, screw on ND, and a light wide angle prime (zeiss still lens, cinemodded). No wireless FF, no wireless transmitter, no mattebox, no 4x4 filters, etc.

Can I get away with flying this on a Pilot or a Scout? The Zephyr is just way too far out of the budget.
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#2 Brian Freesh

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:03 PM

Weigh the set up you'll be using, get a rig that can handle that weight and is within your budget.

It's really that simple.

If it's close to the weight limit of a rig, get a rig that holds more, cause you'll want to add another accessory some day. It'll happen.

Look for used rigs. Maybe for the same price as a Pilot you can get a used Flyer with batteries. Or some other great deal.
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#3 Louis Puli SOC

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:56 PM

I would spend your money with your local operators .You say you don't need Focus controls , Transmitters ,hard mounts ,etc ,etc where in fact you do if you could afford it right. How about a Fig Rig very little skill required in comparison and much cheaper .
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#4 Alan Rencher

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:30 AM

Your money will be better spent on an operator. Without practice and dedication, most amateur Steadicam just ends up looking handheld anyway.
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#5 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:02 AM

Hey, I answered you on REDuser already, you really don't want to invest in a steadicam if you can't use it properly.
Not having a Follow focus defeats the purpose of even using a steadicam in the first place, avoiding the matte box is not a good idea as you are mobile, you will get flares constantly. Plus, going lighter will introduce issues and render your shot close to unusable.
The Zephyr is the smallest model that I would buy to fly a Epic/Scarlet with. It is an investment, but so is your camera, a set of good lens etc...
If you want to fool around with a cheap steadicam, maybe getting a Pilot ($3,995.00) and use a lighter camera on top could be the solution. The Red is a pro camera, use it as such, otherwise use a 5D on a Pilot, or a GoPro on a Smoothie.

I currently fly a Zephyr and am looking into switching to a bigger rig within the year already.
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#6 Janice Arthur

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:52 AM

Michael;

You may not think you'll be a steadicam operator but buying the rig will make you one.

You will also find out really fast these freebees will get old fast and you're not spending "free money" to buy a rig etc.

You'll try a flyer and see if it works but end up needing the accessories they said to make them happy because they'll still say, why isn't it in focus etc.

Buy an Easy rig, and you'll have a short learning curve, and get most of what you want especially if its free.

You're too nice, for free this is a business even for those guys with no money.

Janice

Good luck
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#7 Scott Baker

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:49 PM

I have the Pilot and have used it quite a lot with a Scarlet (even flew the One MX and Epic a few times), though the results were mixed.

If you are truly running a stripped down version of the camera, it works great. But like some of the earlier posts mentioned, it's not ideal to limit yourself like that. You will undoubtedly find yourself in a situation where you want to add on some accessories (like those heavy batteries) and then you'll have trouble getting the smooth shots you wanted.

The Scout apparently has an 18lb limit which I think should be good for the Scarlet but I have not had experience with that, maybe someone else can chime in.

To sum up, the Pilot is OK in a pinch for the Scarlet, but if you're gonna lay down some cash to own one and learn to use it, go with a bigger rig.
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#8 Ross Zuchowski

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:22 PM

I'd agree with the Zephyr recommendation that was made by Victor.

@Scott B - How did you fly the One MX and Epic on a Pilot - I tried to fly a 5D with a cine prime and some motors and was having trouble keeping it under weight.
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#9 Mark Schlicher

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 12:17 PM

Given your original specs...loosely paraphrased: to fly a stripped Scarlet for hobbiest/personal shoots, my personal opinion is that your best bang for the buck may be a used Flyer LE, depending on the deal you can get. A new Scout would be a next choice. Pilot is fine, too, but there is very little "headroom" to add weight, and the vest is flimsy. I've never seen a used Scout for sale, but it would probably be a little better choice than a Flyer, if you could get it for a similar price. The vest and arm are essentially the same, but the Scout sled is new and improved.

A Zephyr is a bigger investment but will take longer to outgrow, as it can take on a fully-outfitted Epic, as well as C300, C500, F3, etc. and most broadcast cameras. I'm starting to see used Zephyrs for sale from time to time.
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#10 Scott Baker

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 05:06 PM

I'd agree with the Zephyr recommendation that was made by Victor.

@Scott B - How did you fly the One MX and Epic on a Pilot - I tried to fly a 5D with a cine prime and some motors and was having trouble keeping it under weight.


The Epic was stripped down as much as possible and just a wide lens (canon mount still lens I believe) so no FF needed.
The One MX was something else. It was an emergency situation where they needed a couple quick shots, something that would look better than handheld. It was exterior and quite bright so they had to have a matte box mounted on rails, in addition to the big battery and the 320gb external hard drive. Needless to say this was way more than my poor little Pilot was designed for. I had to compensate with my arms for the extra weight but we got the shots. I would def not recommend this.
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#11 Mark Baluk

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 07:12 PM

did the sled balance out perfectly fine with the included weights,monitor etc? or did you add some weight below?
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#12 Brian Freesh

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 12:31 AM

That Red One set up easily breaks 20lbs, twice the rated weight for the Pilot.
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#13 Scott Baker

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:39 PM

did the sled balance out perfectly fine with the included weights,monitor etc? or did you add some weight below?

I added all the weights that I had and it still didn't quite balance perfectly.
It was maybe a pound too heavy... like I said, would not recommend.
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