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Could someone please explain


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#1 Ken Robert Haltvik

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 04:08 AM

Hi, I bought a Wondlan steadicam not long ago and there where no manual with it.. so I kind of have figured out most things the hard way.

However could some one please explain to me how much should spring 1 (the one close to the body) and spring 2 (the one closest to the gimbal) be adjustet (how tight or loose) and what effect it will
have to have to tighten one or both, and losen one or both?

I hope someone understands my question, because im terrible at eplaining..
I tried to ad a pic, but it seems like there have to be a link to a pic.


Yours.
Ken Robert
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#2 Ken Robert Haltvik

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 04:09 AM

I found a pic on google image. Hope this makes it a little easier

http://www.google.co...88&tx=102&ty=43
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#3 Mark Schlicher

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 09:20 PM

Very unlikely anyone on this forum will have experience with your specific rig, which is not used by professionals. The general answer to your question is that the two arm sections should be adjusted so that the camera sled "floats" roughly level...and that neither arm section has greater tension than the other. To test, you should suit up, with a camera attached and balanced, and lift the sled all the way to the top, then to the bottom, of the range of travel. Both arm sections should hit the limits of their range at roughly the same time. When you let it float using a loose grip on the arm, it should settle at roughly the middle of the range of travel.

Rather than trying to figure things out yourself, you should study and practice the general principles by purchasing the Steadicam Operators Handbook, and the Steadicam EFP Training DVD (both available from Tiffen.)

You may also download the Steadicam Pilot operating manual from the Tiffen website. Though obviously directed specifically at their rig, it also covers exercises and general operating principles that apply regardless of the rig. Good luck.
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#4 Ken Robert Haltvik

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 04:18 AM

Very unlikely anyone on this forum will have experience with your specific rig, which is not used by professionals. The general answer to your question is that the two arm sections should be adjusted so that the camera sled "floats" roughly level...and that neither arm section has greater tension than the other. To test, you should suit up, with a camera attached and balanced, and lift the sled all the way to the top, then to the bottom, of the range of travel. Both arm sections should hit the limits of their range at roughly the same time. When you let it float using a loose grip on the arm, it should settle at roughly the middle of the range of travel.

Rather than trying to figure things out yourself, you should study and practice the general principles by purchasing the Steadicam Operators Handbook, and the Steadicam EFP Training DVD (both available from Tiffen.)

You may also download the Steadicam Pilot operating manual from the Tiffen website. Though obviously directed specifically at their rig, it also covers exercises and general operating principles that apply regardless of the rig. Good luck.



Thank you!:)
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#5 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 10:24 AM

Very unlikely anyone on this forum will have experience with your specific rig, which is not used by professionals. The general answer to your question is that the two arm sections should be adjusted so that the camera sled "floats" roughly level...and that neither arm section has greater tension than the other. To test, you should suit up, with a camera attached and balanced, and lift the sled all the way to the top, then to the bottom, of the range of travel. Both arm sections should hit the limits of their range at roughly the same time. When you let it float using a loose grip on the arm, it should settle at roughly the middle of the range of travel.

Rather than trying to figure things out yourself, you should study and practice the general principles by purchasing the Steadicam Operators Handbook, and the Steadicam EFP Training DVD (both available from Tiffen.)

You may also download the Steadicam Pilot operating manual from the Tiffen website. Though obviously directed specifically at their rig, it also covers exercises and general operating principles that apply regardless of the rig. Good luck.



Thank you!:)


I agree the EFP DVD was an amazing introduction to the steadicam and the The Steadicam® Operator’s Handbook is a great in depth exploration.
DVD: http://www.steadicam...am_efp_dvd.html
Book: http://www.amazon.co.../dp/024082380Xf

Also look at http://www.steadicam-news.com they have good resources gathered in one location with training videos and interesting articles.
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#6 Spring Chen

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 10:46 PM

Hello Ken,

 

How's your wondlan steadicam work now?


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#7 Alan Rencher

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 11:15 PM

I tried the Wondlan out at NAB, and I can tell you that the arm does not function the way a professional arm should. It bounces, and does not isolate the sled from your body's movement. I don't even know if the manufacturer could answer your question.
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