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Low mode or Antlers on RED EPIC


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#1 thomas-english

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:17 PM

How are you guys putting your dovetails onto the top of the RED epic? Straight onto the tactical top plate? Does the camera overheat since you'll now be blocking all those vents.
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#2 William Demeritt

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:39 PM

For low mode, I'm just inverting the camera and the AC flips the image in the camera (or we send a note to edit to flip the image in post). I haven't had any issues with the camera overheating, even with the vents now at the bottom (with the camera upside down).
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#3 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 05:54 PM

Same here. I just flip the rig and it's up to the editor to flip the image. It's easier and faster, plus flipping the camera will give you some issues with cooling unless you use a cage. For antlers, I would screw them on a top cheese plate (but Have never done it yet).
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#4 brooksrobinson

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:09 AM

The feature I was on earlier in the year used the Red Epic. Other than being a colossal pain in the ass to operate conventionally with, it was fine in steadicam mode with some modification at the camera house. Our package came out of Panavision Woodland Hills and the steadicam body came with a cheese-plate on top that I used to mount my top dovetail plate. I have always favored taking the 5 minutes to flip into true low-mode, so the cheese-plate worked well for me.

Not that you asked, but we used 15mm rods out of the back to mount two A/B Dionic HC batteries. This combination, coupled with a 15-40mm or 28-76mm with two Preston motors made for a light but (fairly) stable camera. Since the camera was being powered by the HC’s up top, I only used one HC battery to power my sled. I mounted the Wevi down below to better distribute the weight, and since none of the moves we did were very long, having it at the base worked reasonably well.

We had no issues on steadicam with overheating due to the top dovetail plate, but we did experience some issues with heat in conventional mode (dolly) when doing long takes (15 minutes plus – don’t ask). It sucks to be shooting a close-up on an iconic A-list actor as he delivers a quiet monologue in a highly emotional scene, only to have the fan kick on…did I mention that I dislike this camera? Grateful my current film is using the Alexa.

Good luck!

Brooks
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#5 thomas-english

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:23 AM

Thanks Brooks, do you have any photos?

Yes I am aware of upside down low mode! I am though interested in how on earth you would do it if you couldn't go upside down.

There are instances where video village can't handle upside down or rolling shutter needs to match for compositing where you can't go upside down.

Also... Antlers.

Thanks
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#6 William Demeritt

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:51 AM

RE: upside down: you can set the camera to rotate the image. When you flip the camera upside down, video village still gets a right-side up image, and edit doesn't need to flip anything. On the day, however, you'll need to rotate the image in your Steadicam monitor in order to operate.

As for proper low mode, the handle that comes with many Epic setups comes with numerous 3/8-16 and 1/4-20 screw holes. If I had to, I'd just mate those holes to my dovetail.
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#7 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:51 PM

I've been working a bit lately with a DP who owns an Epic and he has it tricked out better than any I've seen. The primary reason for this is that he has the "PRO I/O" back which RED is now finally shipping. This back offers a number of "in/out" connectors making the likes of messy SDI splitter boxes obsolete. It also makes the weight distribution of the camera far better yet the overall weight is still very light. As you'll see in this photo, he is using the RED Volt batteries, but I would imagine any rental house purchasing these I/O backs would use an A/B or V-lock mount. With this back in place, the camera ends up feeling much like an Alexa. As for low-mode, I've done it both ways (flip in post/turn it over physically).

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#8 thomas-english

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 12:20 PM

William, have you actually done that with the Epic? Rotated the image in camera? I tried a little while ago and whilst it was flopped it wasn't flipped so one could use it in a mirror rig. I had the same problem on the Alexa. Has it improved? Does that work now?

I agree rotating the camera upside down is definitely the best, quickest and most solid option. However even if your technique does work in-camera it still doesn't fix the rolling shutter being from the wrong direction and doesn't fix my antlers.

Really what I am asking is. Dovetail on the top of the Epic? Is it overheating it?
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#9 brooksrobinson

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 08:59 PM

Thomas,

We did not have any problems with the Epic overheating due to having a dovetail plate mounted on top of the camera for low-mode.

Brooks
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