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#1 Gus Trivino

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 05:52 AM

Hey!

Next Sunday will be my first time working "in live" on a TV Show.
Really, I am a little bit nervous, and the production crew "helpme" passing me all the adrenaline of the first show of the year :ph34r:

Yesterday I went to do some test with all the crew and check the equipment.
In a few minuts, I Learned hate the Triax :P
I promise some pics.
Probably Diego Maradona will be on the show.
Best regards,


Gus.
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#2 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 08:42 AM

Break a leg (not really!) Hope all goes well!

- Mikko
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#3 Jason Williams

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 11:38 AM

Good luck, I have my first shoot next week, on film, first time for me as well, but really looking forward to it!

Looking forward to seeing some pictures too :D

Hope all goes well!

Jason
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#4 George Grammatikos

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:15 PM

hi Guys
Triangle good luck ,cool and don't be nervus ,buy a triax adaptor and believe me you will love triax (specially if you meet multi)more than any other cable ,but you will always hate cables.
Jason Good luck to you also!
You will find that film cameras fly better than video(specially when film running ,make things more easy ) you will love it (no cables )
Fly safe
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#5 MarkKaravite

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Posted 09 April 2005 - 07:08 PM

Dear Gus,

Just a few tips for live shows:

It's good advice to get a triax adapter. I had one of the Tiffen units that mounts to the chest spar on your vest, and I had a lot of problems with it. The cables constantly had intermittent problems, and it is very expensive. Fred Davis at Production Cable Services has a nice lightweight triax cable for less than $300. Make sure you put a saftey loop on your back somewhere to protect the connector on your cable, and put the stress on the truck's cable.

Buy a tally light. Peter Abraham makes a well designed tally light that is cheap, I think around $100. It's important to know when your "Hot". You'll never see the camera's tally while operating.

Plan your battery changes. Look at the show's schedule and find the appropriate time to swap batteries. If your not sure, swap them early. Let your Director know ahead of time when you plan on swapping batteries.

Order a wireless headset ahead of time. If you use the camera's headset, you'll have another cable to deal with, in addition to the traix. Also, bring earplugs for your ear if you use a single muff headset. Check out the volume on the headsets, especially for concert work. Sometimes the engineers can give you more volume, or order David Clark headsets if the shoot is really loud. It's like wearing a vice on your head, but you can hear.

Work with your cable puller during rehearsals. Make sure he/she knows exactly where you need to go with the rig. Add cable drops for spots you can't easily get to with a tether. Sometimes you need 2 cable pullers, one with you, and another off to the side feeding him cables. Also determine if your cable puller is worthwhile as a spotter. A good spotter can really help keep you safe. I was in the 3rd hour of straight operating on a concert, & during the encore, I nearly stepped right off the stage. Fatigue will wreak havoc on your concentration. The spotter saved my ass, and drank free beer that night.

Forget the pain, go with the zen, and have a safe shoot.

Mark Karavite
Steadicam Owner / Operator
Michigan
mkaravite@comcast.net
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#6 Gus Trivino

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 05:42 AM

Hey!

Thanks a lot for the advices.
Everithing was ok, but 1:30 hours without stop is hard for my back... <_<
I learned that Tally IS really necessary.
Know when somebody is "hot" is very important, and see the Camera tally is dificult.
Maradona donĀ“t went to the show, but in a few weeks he will go.
Some pics will arrive.
Best,


Gus
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#7 Erik Brul

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 01:24 PM

Hi Gus,

Very nice to hear that everything went well.. !!
Hope for you that more jobs will follow this one.

Regards, Erik
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#8 Nicholas M. Chopp

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 03:12 PM

Dear Gus,

Just a few tips for live shows:

It's good advice to get a triax adapter.  I had one of the Tiffen units that mounts to the chest spar on your vest, and I had a lot of problems with it.  The cables constantly had intermittent problems, and it is very expensive.  Fred Davis at Production Cable Services has a nice lightweight triax cable for less than $300.  Make sure you put a saftey loop on your back somewhere to protect the connector on your cable, and put the stress on the truck's cable.

Buy a tally light.  Peter Abraham makes a well designed tally light that is cheap, I think around $100.  It's important to know when your "Hot".  You'll never see the camera's tally while operating.

Plan your battery changes.  Look at the show's schedule and find the appropriate time to swap batteries.  If your not sure, swap them early.  Let your Director know ahead of time when you plan on swapping batteries.

Order a wireless headset ahead of time.  If you use the camera's headset, you'll have another cable to deal with, in addition to the traix.  Also, bring earplugs for your ear if you use a single muff headset.  Check out the volume on the headsets, especially for concert work.  Sometimes the engineers can give you more volume, or order David Clark headsets if the shoot is really loud.  It's like wearing a vice on your head, but you can hear.

Work with your cable puller during rehearsals.  Make sure he/she knows exactly where you need to go with the rig.  Add cable drops for spots you can't easily get to with a tether.  Sometimes you need 2 cable pullers, one with you, and another off to the side feeding him cables.  Also determine if your cable puller is worthwhile as a spotter.  A good spotter can really help keep you safe.  I was in the 3rd hour of straight operating on a concert, & during the encore, I nearly stepped right off the stage.  Fatigue will wreak havoc on your concentration.  The spotter saved my ass, and drank free beer that night.

Forget the pain, go with the zen, and have a safe shoot.

Mark Karavite
Steadicam Owner / Operator
Michigan
mkaravite@comcast.net

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Good comments. Don't forget hydration - sports drinks are the best, for the saline. Keep a few bottles of Powerade\Gatorade\whatever in select spots around your area.
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#9 Gus Trivino

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 03:30 PM

hey guys...
thaks a lot for the advices.
Here a pic.

Best,

Gus.
  • 0




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