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Something for under $1000, under $2000???


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#1 jmf

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Posted 06 April 2005 - 11:06 PM

I'm VERY new to this.
And very naive.
I really thought that for $300, I could pick up a steadicam or something like it.

I don't have much of a budget for this, and doing it part-time, cannot justify a huge expense.
Is there anything for less than $1000? or less than $2000 that would be worthwhile?

And now, I'm really going to show my ignorance:
I'm amazed that there is so much to this! What does a steadicam do, isn't it just for stabilizing the camera?
Why does it take workshops and so much practice that I see people refer to here?
I realize that a lot of you experienced folks are probably getting a good chuckle out of the simplistic nature of my questions, but I'm trying to understand what I'm getting myself into, here.

My main need is for interviewing people, while walking or moving, so my steadicam needs are probably not too sophisticated - just something that will give me steady shots while in motion.
I use a Canon XL1, which weighs 6lbs.

Any advce would be much appreciated.

Thanks very much for your input.
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#2 Nicholas M. Chopp

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Posted 06 April 2005 - 11:25 PM

JMF,

Glad you're showing an interest. As you've noticed, there IS a lot to it. It's not the kind of thing you can just strap on, run around in for a few hours, and get some good-looking stuff. It's physically exhausting, and it takes hours of practice over years to get really good. I'm not anywhere close to even being just good, and I've been shooting on and off for a few years now.

Having a strong background in AV\Film Production beforehand will help you a lot. The basics of composition and lighting are the same - just add that motion thing. ;-)

You can pick up a Glidecam V-8 for about 2 grand used, if you get lucky...
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#3 RobVanGelder

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 12:54 AM

I'm VERY new to this.
And very naive.
I really thought that for $300, I could pick up a steadicam or something like it.


<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



If people could make a living by investing ONLY $300, how many would jump on that.....?

And that is true for every profession, you need a lot more, in education, time and hard coins!

Look at your own camera, that´s a lot more than 300 and it´s really at the LOOOOW side of (semi-)professional equipment.
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#4 jmf

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 06:36 AM

JMF,

Glad you're showing an interest. As you've noticed, there IS a lot to it. It's not the kind of thing you can just strap on, run around in for a few hours, and get some good-looking stuff. It's physically exhausting, and it takes hours of practice over years to get really good. I'm not anywhere close to even being just good, and I've been shooting on and off for a few years now.

Having a strong background in AV\Film Production beforehand will help you a lot. The basics of composition and lighting are the same - just add that motion thing. ;-)

You can pick up a Glidecam V-8 for about 2 grand used, if you get lucky...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


nchopp,

Thank you. Any tips on where to find a Glidecam v-8 for $2000?

Also, does anyone here know anything about Varizoom?
It seems to be an off-brand (cheap knock-off?) of the Glidecam or Steadicam.
Does anyone here know anything about it?

Thanks again.
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#5 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 08:48 AM

(Sorry folks for this one...)


Ahem.. *polite cough* just FYI: Glidecam IS a Nock-Off of the Steadicam. A decent one, but still a nock-off.

Just gota keep things in perspective, ya know. ;)


-Mikko
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#6 SanderMuller

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 10:15 AM

If we look at it that way we could say that everything that came after the gear that Garret invented is a rip off of steadicam.
We could recommend a flyer but why try if he isnt even shure about his steadicam future. maybe try a workshop first? and then he can deside to buy a flyer or whatever rig he is into.
I agree with Rob that beeing good or even the best doenst come cheap in money and time. One workshop is a good base but doesnt make you a good operator.
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#7 JobScholtze

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 12:23 PM

(Sorry folks for this one...)


Glidecam IS a Nock-Off



<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

cough, and a damn good one. :D
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#8 jmf

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:25 PM

(Sorry folks for this one...)


Glidecam IS a Nock-Off



<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

cough, and a damn good one. :D

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


OK, you're right. Guess the fact that this is the STEADICAM forum should have tipped my off to that.

Another question:
Would the Steadicam Jr. (I can hear your snickering already), which is rated to hold 4lbs., work on my Canon which weighs 6? Obviously, it wouldn't be ideal, but would there by any benefit to using the Junior with my Canon, over not using any stabilzation at all?

Also, if I were to supplement it with the Varizoom DV Sportster ( http://www.varizoom....vsportster.php), might that give me the extra support to equal a totally stable rig?

Thanks very much.

J.
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#9 Nicholas M. Chopp

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:51 PM

The Jr. is, to be honest, a pretty sub-standard piece of equipment. The largest camera I'd put on it would probably be a GL1\PD-150 type cam, not an XL1. The lack of an LCD on the XL1 would pose a problem as well - you'll want some kind of system with the capability for an external monitor on the sled.
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#10 Tom Wills

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 02:49 PM

Hey! I realize that it's been a few days, but being new to this form and not so new to stabilizers, I thought I'd enter my advice in here. Why not build your own? It's pretty damn easy to do, and for around $500 you can get a quite well built machine (Cody Deegan's system fits the bill perfectly: Cody's Site). Look into this a bunch, as this is what I have done, and it's satisfied my needs perfectly, not to mention being custom built for all my quirks in operating style.

Good luck with your films. Oh, and if you want more info on homebuilding, come on over and check out my homebuilder breathren at HomeBuiltStabilizers (The site is temporarily down for construction, so here are the Forums).

See ya later.
-Tom
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