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Wedge-Tilt Plates


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#1 Katerina Kallergis

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 05:52 PM

Just doing some Google searches for a tilt plate and came up with these.
What do you all think? Good idea? Bad one? Too heavy?

I saw the Cat-Griller but it doesn't seem all that quick as far as switching out the different size posts to best suit the tilt you need. Plus, I don't like the name too much. =/

Anyway, the links are below:


GF Tilt Plate

Wedg Tilt Plate by Panther

Thanks,
Kat
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#2 Brian Freesh

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 08:11 PM

If you are talking about tilting a camera while flying it on your rig, you either need a Tiffen Rig or this:

http://www.betz-tool...c_tiltplate.php

I don't remember what the details of Tiffen's patent are and if this is a violation of it or not, since it's not actually integrated into the sled. I'm sure someone knows better than me.

Whatever you do, don't get any of the options you mentioned for tilting on your rig. Simply adjust the fore/aft of the camera until you reach the desired tilt.
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#3 Katerina Kallergis

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:30 AM

If you are talking about tilting a camera while flying it on your rig, you either need a Tiffen Rig or this:

http://www.betz-tool...c_tiltplate.php

I don't remember what the details of Tiffen's patent are and if this is a violation of it or not, since it's not actually integrated into the sled. I'm sure someone knows better than me.

Whatever you do, don't get any of the options you mentioned for tilting on your rig. Simply adjust the fore/aft of the camera until you reach the desired tilt.



Thanks for the input Brian.

I did see the Betz-tools tilt plate but I do not have a Pro or MKV rig. I have a Masters series and was looking for an easier way than installing something between the post and the top stage. Lots of wiring to get around. I do already adjust the fore/aft of the camera, and of course this works but it would be nice to keep it balanced. I guess the only option is the Cat-Griller. What's the problem with the two links I sent, is it the weight of the plates? Would be nice to have something like that but lighter with less bulk.

-Kat
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#4 Brian Freesh

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 02:03 AM

Do as you have been, you're fine without and you have no easy solution without changing rigs. You balance for the shot regardless, so the rig is never out of balance (when you're ready to go), it's just not balanced vertically anymore.

The adage about tilt stages is that if you have it you use it, if you don't have it you don't miss it. I actually rarely use mine.

If you add a tilt between the camera and the top stage you will completely change the balance of the entire rig when you tilt the camera. The weight of the camera will shift up and forward (if tilting down) so you'll have to make the sled heavier and/or longer, and/or move the gimbal up if it has room. You'll introduce something to vibrate. All of these things get much worse the farther you tilt.

I suppose the weight is no big deal if you are using very lightweight cameras, but I'd still rather have a solid slab of metal that is completely rigid.

The beauty of the stage tilting instead of something above it is that the camera does not move nearly as much. After tilting you just adjust your fore/aft and you're quickly back in balance.

Save your money. If you have cash to burn, buy a different sled. :)
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#5 RonBaldwin

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 11:17 AM

I know you mentioned the catgriller (dogcatcher?) one, but the Panther plate is over 3 lbs and the GF plate is over 5. Seems Markus' plate would be much lighter and better suited for steadicam?

Attached Files


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#6 Jerry Holway

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 11:32 AM

I'm just looking at the image, and wonder if Kat's dovetail plates will have issues with the safety system and/or the ability to move the dovetail plate adequately.

Does anyone with a Master Series and a MS dovetail use this combination, and are there issues??

Jerry
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#7 Brian Freesh

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:03 PM

It occurred to me I've been assuming you want to use this in every day situations, like a tilt stage is intended for. In which case I stand behind my earlier opinion. If you're looking for something for a specific application that I am probably unable to foresee having not done it, then game on, any lightweight option is the way to go.
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#8 Katerina Kallergis

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 04:07 PM

I know you mentioned the catgriller (dogcatcher?) one, but the Panther plate is over 3 lbs and the GF plate is over 5. Seems Markus' plate would be much lighter and better suited for steadicam?



That is pretty nice. The one I saw had different pegs for different tilt heights. Like Jerry said though, I wonder if it fits my dovetail.


Brian,

The purpose of it is for those times I need it constantly tilted, ie: for headroom and/or avoiding lights or glare above the talents head.

Thanks,
Kat
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#9 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 09:51 PM

Just doing some Google searches for a tilt plate and came up with these.
What do you all think? Good idea? Bad one? Too heavy?

I saw the Cat-Griller but it doesn't seem all that quick as far as switching out the different size posts to best suit the tilt you need. Plus, I don't like the name too much. =/

Anyway, the links are below:


GF Tilt Plate

Wedg Tilt Plate by Panther

Thanks,
Kat


Kat,
I own both of them, but they are definitely not designed for Steadicam.
The Grip Factory Munich tilt plate is fantastic, and I use it mainly on a geared head, if I do not want to mess with the integrated wedge plate on the Panahead or Arrihead. It is a very stable solution with a hand crank.
As Ron points out ... they are really heavy, and raise your camera height substantially when not in use.
Fortunately I have an Ultra2 ... :D

I hear good things about the Baer Bel tilt plate (Kat Griller ?? ;) )
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#10 Katerina Kallergis

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:53 PM

[/quote]

Kat,
I own both of them, but they are definitely not designed for Steadicam.
The Grip Factory Munich tilt plate is fantastic, and I use it mainly on a geared head, if I do not want to mess with the integrated wedge plate on the Panahead or Arrihead. It is a very stable solution with a hand crank.
As Ron points out ... they are really heavy, and raise your camera height substantially when not in use.
Fortunately I have an Ultra2 ... :D

I hear good things about the Baer Bel tilt plate (Kat Griller ?? ;) )
[/quote]


Sorry, just saw this. Thanks for the input. The search continues...
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