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G50X and G70X arm


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#1 Marco Dardari

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 04:43 AM

Someone knows the difference between G50/70 and new G50X/70X arms?
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#2 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 04:47 AM

Hi Marco,

where did you read this? I'm quite curious but on the site nothing mentioned.
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#3 James Davis

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 05:33 AM

Jerry Holway mentioned about them in a recent forum post:

http://www.steadicam...opic=15133&st=0
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#4 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 06:04 AM

Thanks James.
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#5 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 10:10 AM

Garrett promised to send me a demo G50x to test when I saw him at CES last week. I look forward to trying it out.

Robert
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#6 Jerry Holway

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 10:49 AM

The differences between the G50/70 and G750X/70X arms are in the trunion and other bearings, and there are also some subtle geometry changes to improve the isoelastic response.

Everyone should give them a try.

Jerry
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#7 Marco Dardari

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 05:29 AM

Matteo,
I read in the pricing list of steadicam models.
thanks Robert, James and Jerry.
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#8 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 12:05 PM

The differences between the G50/70 and G750X/70X arms are in the trunion and other bearings, and there are also some subtle geometry changes to improve the isoelastic response.

Everyone should give them a try.

Jerry

Jerry,
Does that mean the "Stiction", (is that a word), problem that we all encountered has been eliminated?
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#9 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 12:31 PM

Does that mean the "Stiction", (is that a word), problem that we all encountered has been eliminated?



Yes that is a word, you could also use hysteresis

Iso-elastic is a economic term not a term when dealing with springs and suspension
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#10 Jerry Holway

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 01:30 PM

Eric, I beg to differ.

In addition to its adapted use for economics, isoelastic has a primary physical definition... and all this time I thought Garrett or someone at Cinema Products had invented the term.

Iso-elastic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iso-elasticIn engineering, iso-elastic refers to a system of elastic and tensile parts (springs and pulleys) which are arranged in a configuration which serves to isolate ...
(sorry, the site is down today...)

isoelastic [ahy-soh-i-las-tik]  
i·so·e·las·tic   [ahy-soh-i-las-tik] Show IPA
adjective Physics .
noting or pertaining to a substance or system exhibiting uniform elasticity throughout.
Origin:
iso- + elastic

Related forms
non·i·so·e·las·tic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2012.
Cite This Source | Link To isoelastic

so much for a 2 second search on google.... first page of results, lots of others using the term for physical mechanisms

More importantly, to Rob's question, yes, the stiction issue is gone.

Jerry
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#11 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 01:44 PM

Eric, I beg to differ.

In addition to its adapted use for economics, isoelastic has a primary physical definition... and all this time I thought Garrett or someone at Cinema Products had invented the term.

Iso-elastic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iso-elasticIn engineering, iso-elastic refers to a system of elastic and tensile parts (springs and pulleys) which are arranged in a configuration which serves to isolate ...
(sorry, the site is down today...)



Jerry, the Wikipedia reference was written by someone from Tiffen, Dictionary.com spiders wikkipedia for definations. Nice try. We already went over this in the 3A arm thread. And yes if you would like to discuss this or how arms operate further I'm your huckleberry
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#12 Michael Wilson

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 02:26 PM

More importantly, to Rob's question, yes, the stiction issue is gone.


I wish that the stiction issue would have actually been acknowledged by Tiffen when it was happening to people with the normal G series arms. I lost a lot of sleep over that bouncing arm. I hope some people at tiffen did too.
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#13 Mark Schlicher

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 02:45 PM

http://www.google.co...epage&q&f=false
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC1438013/
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#14 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 03:22 PM

Okay, now you do realize that Tiffen uses it as a trade or service mark and that the definition has changed several times over the years.
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#15 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 03:23 PM

Is there a way to get the old G series fixed? May be an upgrade. It would be really good.

maqu
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