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lcd brightness


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#1 Brad Smith

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Posted 19 February 2005 - 08:53 PM

Can any body shed more light on how to measure the "brightness" of the screen on an lcd (or crt for that matter) monitor. The two units of measurement I've come across are NIT and Candela. Having seen a monitor that is described as 650 NIT I can make a comparison to other manufactures who describe their products using NIT but how do NIT compare to for example the hummingbird which is 800 Candela.

Can anyone tell me where to look for info and measuring brightness/luminence/NIT/Candela.

Brad "in the dark" Smith :(
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#2 RobVanGelder

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Posted 19 February 2005 - 10:38 PM

http://www.holophane...duct/pdfs/6.pdf

And Nits is Cd/m2
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#3 James Livingston

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Posted 22 February 2005 - 11:08 AM

http://www.holophane...duct/pdfs/6.pdf

And Nits is Cd/m2

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Brad...This is a difficult spec to corelate to any other lighting specs. Luckily most monitor manufacturers are writing their specs in NITS or Cd/m2.

In my experience, for a monitor to be visible in daylight, the Brightness will need to be at least 800NITS. There are brighter monitors available depending on the price you are willing to pay (ie...HD-Ulrabrite @ 1400NITS).

Another Spec to watch for is the contrast ratio. A higher contrast ratio will provide an overall better image and less diffusion will occur.

Ed Digiulio best described it referring to his LCD watch. Because the Contast ratio of the black over white crystal was so high that there was little need for backlighting.

Most LCDs run in the 200:1 Contrast range. The higher the contrast ratio means the less brightness is required to be visible in daylight.

Also, check into what AR (Anti-reflective) coatings the manufacturer is using. All the brightness and contrast in the world will do you no good if there are reflections on the monitor's front glass.

I hope this helps.

James
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#4 Brad Smith

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Posted 28 February 2005 - 04:42 PM

Cheers guys for the tips, I'm keen to see the new Cine IIIa from transvideo. Not quite the specs of the tiffen but also not the same price! B)
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