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Trained dancers wear Steadicam in live vision "Abacus" performance piece

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#1 Chris Poynton

Chris Poynton

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:09 PM

Two trained dancers swirling, wearing Steadicam rigs, with live vision shown on six vertical screens.

Steadicam highlights shown at

This performance piece called ABACUS, created by Early Morning Opera, premiered in 2010 and according to YouTube description is to be included in Sundance Film Festival 2012.

Looks like cameras were mounted conventionally, with vision cropped to vertical/portrait format.

The artistic statement from the EarlyMorningOpera.com states that the six-screen display was a homage to Buckminster Fuller's fabled vision of a "Geoscope", which wikipedia describes as "a proposal by Buckminster Fuller in 1962 to create a 200-foot-diameter (61 m) globe, which would be covered in colored lights so that it could function as a large spherical display. It was envisioned that the Geoscope would be connected to computers which would allow it to display both historical and current data, and enable people to visualize large scale patterns around the globe."
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#2 Michael Wilson

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:24 AM

This is very similar to a nightmare I had the other night, except I was naked at the time.
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#3 Wolfgang Troescher

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:59 AM

This is very similar to a nightmare I had the other night, except I was naked at the time.

Would be a top video on youtube ;-)
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