Jump to content



Photo

ramp gradient


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 thomas-english

thomas-english

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1165 posts
  • UK

Posted 06 June 2011 - 01:23 PM

Silly question really as I think the answere is 30 degrees but..

What is a good but steep gradient for a ramp when operating steadicam on foot. I gotta request a ramp for this ad at the end of the week. Normally the chippy is there and you can look at it or show him. i gotta do this one blind... 30 degrees?
  • 0

#2 Charles Papert

Charles Papert

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2224 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 06 June 2011 - 01:50 PM

I used to use a non-scientific but grip-friendly measurement: an apple and a half high (30") for a 4x8 piece of plywood. I sucked at geometry so I can't remember how to calculate the resulting angle...
  • 0

#3 Robert Starling SOC

Robert Starling SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1134 posts
  • Las Vegas, NV

Posted 06 June 2011 - 02:37 PM

30" of rise over a 96" span is a 31.25% grade
  • 0

#4 RonBaldwin

RonBaldwin

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2351 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 06 June 2011 - 08:49 PM

30% is about 15 deg. My crazy driveway is almost 20 degrees, pretty steep. A 30 degree incline is quite steep to walk up.
  • 0

#5 Sanjay Sami

Sanjay Sami

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 429 posts
  • India

Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:58 AM

30% is about 15 deg. My crazy driveway is almost 20 degrees, pretty steep. A 30 degree incline is quite steep to walk up.


I think 30 degrees would be really hard to walk up with steadicam. 15 to 20 should be more manageable.
  • 0

#6 thomas-english

thomas-english

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1165 posts
  • UK

Posted 07 June 2011 - 03:57 AM

Thanks guys!
  • 0

#7 PeterAbraham

PeterAbraham

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 902 posts
  • New York City

Posted 15 June 2011 - 07:06 PM

Used to drag around a wooden ramp. 4x8 foot sheet of 1" ply, cut lengthwise. Screwed together in a million places. Covered with that self-adhesive ├╝uber-gritty black step tread stuff you can buy in bundles at Lowes or Home Despot.

Took two of the thickest angle irons I could find. Bolted them to one end.

Now I had a ramp of variable inclination. Pick the angle, hook it onto the step of a very strong ladder and you're good. A few apple boxes under it half way up to reduce flex and bounce. Worked like a charm, fit into the Mini Van.

Some weisenheimer grip wrote " Steadi ramp " on it on a job. :)

Wish I had photos of it in use. Pulled off a "crane shot" in front of the Ed Sullivan Theatre years ago, where Letterman is shot. Walked down at an angle from sign to sidewalk, straight into lobby, theatre, etc.

Very inexpensive way to skin this cat.

Best to all,

Peter Abraham
Director of Technical Services, Steadicam®
The Tiffen Company
pabraham@tiffen.com
  • 0

#8 thomas-english

thomas-english

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1165 posts
  • UK

Posted 16 June 2011 - 05:17 PM

I followed Charles gradient calculation and had a wicked ramp made up for the end of the one shot commercial. The DoP was well chuffed with the rushes and said it looked better than it wouldve on a technocrane (the other option).

I now have a massive articulated ramp in my basement.

Intrigued Peter by your ramp. I wish you did have some photos! How wide is this ladder at the end and is it freestanding? Can you sketch a picture?
  • 0

#9 PeterAbraham

PeterAbraham

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 902 posts
  • New York City

Posted 17 June 2011 - 10:35 AM

Hi Thomas,
Sadly no photos. The ladder was a regular fiberglass red ladder. 8 foot tall. The kind you find on every grip truck.

The large heavy duty angle irons were bolted in to JUST barely fit inside of the verticals of the ladder up at the steepest angle ( and therefore had a bit of slop side to side on the lowest step ).

Again, very much a home made kit. Used it for a lot of years, however. Support with apple boxes was key. Lacking them ( zero budget jobs ), I would simply stack a few of my cases up so they were jammed underneath the ramp about half way up. Again, enough to eliminate bounce or risk of cracking.
  • 0




GPI Pro Systems

rebotnix Technologies

Omnishot Systems

Wireless Video Systems

BOXX

Teradek

Varizoom Follow Focus

Ritter Battery

PLC Electronics Solutions

PLC - Bartech

Betz Tools for Stabilizers

Paralinx LLC

IDX

Boland Communications

Engineered Cinema Solutions

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

SkyDreams