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G50 arm weight-range/sweet spot


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#1 James Davis

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 07:16 AM

Last few jobs were with 5D mark 2's and i've found on one job where we weren't using many accessories, despite tuning the lift right down and playing with the ISO-elasticity, I was still getting a little bit of judder in the arm, it just wasn't as smooth as it normally was, despite using a weight plate with the set-up, so was just wondering, from your experience, whats the ideal weight to load the arm up to, to get it performing optimally in your opinion, I know that heavy/bigger set-ups always run smoother etc etc, as I have noticed, but I was wondering if anyone knew the minimum kind of weight range I need to get my camera build up to to achieve this, sled is an archer 1 by the way in case anyone was going to ask, and the gimbal is in good working order.
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#2 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 09:48 AM

Hi James,

with light load I suggest you turn down Iso knob completely and play just with Lift knob, since isoelasticity is relatively easy with a light load. Then the more you load the more Iso you add (always playing with Life/Ride knob), otherwise I feel the G50 loosing a bit of smoothness and giving a strange feel of reactivity. I mean you make it work more like an old style arm and that's the great thing about this design. Let me know your impressions because I'm not that experienced at all.

my best
maqu
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#3 James Davis

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 10:30 AM

Thanks Matteo, kinda what I been doing, so good to hear I am on the right track, the arm definitely got a good workout on Saturday!
Good to get some feedback though, cheers dude.
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#4 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 11:00 AM

I add a 11 lb weight plate to pretty much any camera < 12-14 lbs with my former G-50 and my PRO arm now as well. IMHO, that bit of inertial mass helps everything behave better.

Robert
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#5 Michael Wilson

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 01:38 PM

I have been having this same problem too. So much so that it is kind of stressing me out. I don't think I had this problem before with my previous rig, which was about a third the price of my new setup. I have talked with veteran ops, tried their sled with my arm, their arm with my sled, etc etc. I haven't really come up with a solution either. I suppose its becoming more bearable or I'm learning to tune it out. No matter how hard I try it can creep into a shot at any moment. It is most apparent when something is close to the lens, strong horizontal lines on walls and so on.

I have detuned the arm, learned to walk softer, taken the ride up and down, added weight and other things I can't think of right now. I guess the best way I can explain it is. I'll take a step or two and sure I may see a tiny bounce or my step may show up in the lens. But along with that is a high frequency bobbing feeling. It will show up when I stop too. It can come in between steps, at the top of step or any time really.

I have thought of several scenarios.

Bad operating/walking I know some of my steps can show up in the lens but this bounce doesn't seem like its coming from me.
Socket block in vest is shifting. tried a friend's klassen vest and saw similar results
Detuning arm helps but still seeing some bounce

Anyway if anybody has any ideas or can make sense of this let me know your ideas. My next moves is to try out other arms like master's, steadyrig, ultra and so on. Pro is out of my price range.
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#6 James Davis

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 06:07 AM

Did a job the other week with a Red, pretty well loaded up, and this problem was not occuring, which leads me to believe the arm is either really fickle in the lower weight ranges with how it performs, or its a genuine issue that the arm does not perform equally across the entire specified weight range that is advertised.....glad to hear I am not alone in this anyways lol.
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#7 RobinThwaites

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 12:17 PM

As a standard setting I would dial out the Iso by 5 turns (clockwise) with any light camera BUT THE MORE YOU PLAY THE MORE YOU CAN TUNE TO YOUR PREFERENCE.

Robin
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#8 chris fawcett

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 06:05 PM

Yeah really, just dial out the iso when you don't need it. The G50 works fine at low loads.

But more mass is more helpful inertia. Work light only when you have to.

Chris
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#9 James Davis

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 06:58 AM

Cheers for the help and advice guys, I wasn't trying to slag off the arm or anything, as it has performed really well on mid-heavy weight loads, but with lighter loads this has been a real issue for me, I did try dialling down the iso a lot, which helps but did not eliminate the issue entirely. I am working on putting together another weight plate/rail configuration similar to something I saw that Charles Papert posted up (although not quite as elaborate), to help on future DSLR work, I think this should make a big difference, compared to the usual weight plate I use.
Also after a conversation I had the other day I am now wondering if it could be to do with the camera flexing on the mount, as I am beginning to think a cage/stiffer base plate combo may be the answer here, seeing as the camera seems to flex a lot under load from the focus motor even with so called anti-twist baseplates, so much so that I think even when it appears to be secure it may not be as secure as needed?
Thankfully I think the new panasonic is going to take a DSLR's place on a lot of shoots, as it is coming out really cheap from the hire houses, and it can be mounted properly to a baseplate/dovetail without all the aggravation associated with DSLR's!

Thanks again guys

James
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#10 Nic Owens

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 07:28 AM

G'day James,
If you do end up in the market for a weight cage, go straight to Janice Arthur. Her cage is fantastically engineered and comes in a great many combinations for weight. I have used mine a number of times with a variety of video and still cameras and I swear by it.
Good luck,
Nic
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#11 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 09:39 AM

Robin just to understand... If you consider 12 the total number of turns (one turns is when I see again the screw that hold together the knob) and consequently you have at 6 your mid and zero point, turning clockwise 5 times the knob (from its center) brings you to almost no ISO. Do I understand correctly? I hope I make myself clear, I know it can be tough to understand for a non ISO user.
If so I do the same.
maqu
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#12 chris fawcett

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 10:05 AM

Hi Matteo,

I think the point is more about how the arm behaves. With a very light load, the arm will require less ISO, so yes, you turn it almost all the way in. Don't worry about counting threads. If the arm is sticky, meaning when you boom it up or down and release pressure, it has a tendency to stick at that height, then you turn the ISO knob clockwise, like Robin said.

I know your arm, Matteo. It served me well!

Keep asking if that's not clear.

All the best,

Chris

Edited by chris fawcett, 02 March 2011 - 10:24 AM.

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#13 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 10:12 AM

Hi Chris,

it's serving me great! but in my understanding is back out more ISO, if it sticks less ISO so back in. right?

maqu
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#14 chris fawcett

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 10:23 AM

Yes!

My mistake. I'll edit my post, so the next person reading this will be even more confused than I am. Thanks!

Chris
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