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Using Vizio 1080p TV/Monitor for video village


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#1 Twojay Dhillon

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 08:37 PM

I am seeing how, other than resorting to using an AJA Hi5 HD-SDI/SDI to HDMI Video and Audio Converter, I can get a wired, full 1080p signal to my Vizio.

I would like to be able to use it as a video village monitor and simply connecting a bnc cable to the camera and then converting bnc to coaxial and connecting to the DTV/TV input on the Vizio is not working.

Yes, I am electronically-retarded! Would somebody mind telling me:

a. Why my simpleton method is not working
b. A workaround
c. A workaround which does not involve spending money on another piece of equipment such as the aforementioned AJA.

Thanks so much!

Edited by Twojay Dhillon, 29 December 2010 - 08:47 PM.

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#2 Twojay Dhillon

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 08:52 PM

Perhaps it's not clear in the above post, but the Vizio is seeing absolutely no signal at all. I have asked the Vizio to scan all channels and it is coming up with nothing. This is with the camera turned on and transmitting.

I have tested to see if the camera is putting out a good signal, and it is. Testing method: camera to Canatrans broadcasting to Hermes wired to Director's Monitors.
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#3 William Demeritt

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 12:49 AM

I think the very briefest explanation I can offer is this: the camera outputs in HD-SDI (High Definition-Serial Digital Interface). Your Vizio's coaxial input (the F connector that you screw a coax cable or BNC to with a female BNC to male F connector) only reads an ATSC signal. Without going into it, your television cannot understand an HD-SDI input through that port, only an ATSC signal (from an HD antenna that receives ATSC signals over the air).
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#4 Twojay Dhillon

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 01:10 AM

I think the very briefest explanation I can offer is this: the camera outputs in HD-SDI (High Definition-Serial Digital Interface). Your Vizio's coaxial input (the F connector that you screw a coax cable or BNC to with a female BNC to male F connector) only reads an ATSC signal. Without going into it, your television cannot understand an HD-SDI input through that port, only an ATSC signal (from an HD antenna that receives ATSC signals over the air).


William, thanks a ton for that very succinct response. B) I shall be ordering the AJA unit in the morning.
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#5 Norbert von der Heidt

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 08:06 AM

I think the very briefest explanation I can offer is this: the camera outputs in HD-SDI (High Definition-Serial Digital Interface). Your Vizio's coaxial input (the F connector that you screw a coax cable or BNC to with a female BNC to male F connector) only reads an ATSC signal. Without going into it, your television cannot understand an HD-SDI input through that port, only an ATSC signal (from an HD antenna that receives ATSC signals over the air).



Thanks will
I've been so used to NTSC for the past 32 years, I was about to correct your ATSC when I thought I'd better check the exact definition again on the web. Surprise, surprise,:blink: I find NTSC had been superceeded by ATSC in 2009 so thanks for the education! That's what I get for now living in a PAL country.

Cheers
Norbert
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#6 William Demeritt

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 03:37 PM

That's what I get for now living in a PAL country.


:lol: well, in all fairness, NTSC really mostly (or used to mostly) cover North America and some of South/Central America. SECAM and PAL seem to control the rest of the world. But yea, since the ATSC conversion in 2009, TV's equipped with NTSC tuners seems to be on the decline. They all seem to go with ATSC coax connections for HD antenna, RGB composite connections or HDMI connections for HD.

I think only LCDTV's designed for broadcast monitoring come with HD-SDI connections. They wouldn't want people thinking there's a just-as-good-as-HDMI solution (that costs less) out there like HD-SDI. Then who would Monster sell $100 HDMI cables to!?

Being that I own a Modulus 2000, and have recently gone hunting for small, portable LCDTV's that still have an analog NTSC tuner built into them, the information was still kinda fresh in my mind.

By the way, if you're looking for a small, portable NTSC-capable LCDTV, check out the Viore 7" monitor. Costs less than $100, has a 90 minute built in LiON battery (I'm soon adding an AB mount and wiring for longer power), and I can confirm it receives signal from my Modulus 2000. The $400 price tag on the CAMOS inspired me to look elsewhere, and sure enough, options do exist.
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#7 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 06:37 PM

That's what I get for now living in a PAL country.


:lol: well, in all fairness, NTSC really mostly (or used to mostly) cover North America and some of South/Central America. SECAM and PAL seem to control the rest of the world. But yea, since the ATSC conversion in 2009, TV's equipped with NTSC tuners seems to be on the decline. They all seem to go with ATSC coax connections for HD antenna, RGB composite connections or HDMI connections for HD.

I think only LCDTV's designed for broadcast monitoring come with HD-SDI connections. They wouldn't want people thinking there's a just-as-good-as-HDMI solution (that costs less) out there like HD-SDI. Then who would Monster sell $100 HDMI cables to!?

Being that I own a Modulus 2000, and have recently gone hunting for small, portable LCDTV's that still have an analog NTSC tuner built into them, the information was still kinda fresh in my mind.

By the way, if you're looking for a small, portable NTSC-capable LCDTV, check out the Viore 7" monitor. Costs less than $100, has a 90 minute built in LiON battery (I'm soon adding an AB mount and wiring for longer power), and I can confirm it receives signal from my Modulus 2000. The $400 price tag on the CAMOS inspired me to look elsewhere, and sure enough, options do exist.



NTSC also covers Japan
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#8 Sydney Seeber

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 01:38 AM

I think only LCDTV's designed for broadcast monitoring come with HD-SDI connections. They wouldn't want people thinking there's a just-as-good-as-HDMI solution (that costs less) out there like HD-SDI. Then who would Monster sell $100 HDMI cables to!?

you're not going to find consumer-aimed video content being carried digitally over a BNC any time soon because of encryption issues. HDMI is used instead of HDSDI for the consumer market because it was designed to pass encrypted video while HDSDI was not. Content producers would never allow consumer televisions and Blu-Ray players etc. to transmit/receive unencrypted digital video, mainly because of the theoretically "lossless" nature of digital video copies vs. the gradual degradation of analog. That's also one reason that professional gear with HDSDI comes with a built in "Broadcast Surcharge".
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#9 William Demeritt

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 02:29 PM

Content producers would never allow consumer televisions and Blu-Ray players etc. to transmit/receive unencrypted digital video


That's an interesting idea, and if they started out with that in mind, I gotta wonder how they feel about products like the WDTV, Seagate FreeAgent Theater, and even Sony's SMP-U10: all use HDMI connections to play content to consumer televisions, most play back files like DivX, MP4 and MKV (only Sony's doesn't). Sure, my PS3 can play Blurays and requires an HDCP connection to a television to play back that copyrighted format, but with a 3+ year head start on breaking bluray DRM, anyone can rip the bluray with a Windows machine, save as MKV, drop it on a thumb drive and play it on their WDTV Live.

I just find it funny, but then again, I'm a geek... I still have a text file of the DeCSS algorithm saved somewhere when the Digital Millenium Copyright Act tried to have it blocked.
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#10 Sydney Seeber

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 03:12 PM

I don't think anybody honestly believed that encrypted Blu-Ray media would always be un-hackable if you will, but they've gotta make it as difficult as possible for the average consumer anyway. As far as the external boxes go, that is a pretty fine line for someone like Sony, but of course they'd probably justify it by saying the box is designed to store and play back DRM-free content
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#11 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 05:21 PM

I just find it funny, but then again, I'm a geek... I still have a text file of the DeCSS algorithm saved somewhere when the Digital Millenium Copyright Act tried to have it blocked.

You mean you didn't get the t-shirt?
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