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Workshop Advice - Director/Crew working with Operator


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#1 Eric K. Boucher

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:56 AM

Hello all,

I am going to be conducting a Steadicam Workshop next week -- namely protocols, do's/don'ts for Director/Crew -- NOT workshopping operating

I was wondering if any of you beginners or pro's out there could weigh in on some issues/problems that occur on set -- particularly when working with Directors that haven't worked with steadicam before, what the crew should be aware of, etc.

Any and ALL suggestions are welcome!

Thank you!

Eric
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#2 Eric K. Boucher

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 10:40 AM

This could also apply to steadicam assistant/spotter

Hello all,

I am going to be conducting a Steadicam Workshop next week -- namely protocols, do's/don'ts for Director/Crew -- NOT workshopping operating

I was wondering if any of you beginners or pro's out there could weigh in on some issues/problems that occur on set -- particularly when working with Directors that haven't worked with steadicam before, what the crew should be aware of, etc.

Any and ALL suggestions are welcome!

Thank you!

Eric


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#3 Jerry Holway

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 11:18 AM

Some advice for any director, working with anybody on the crew:

The best directors are articulate and clear about what they want to happen. If your words don't connect with another, try some other words, diagrams, storyboards, etc., but it's your job to get others to do what you want. If they don't understand you, you must work harder to communicate, and repeating the same thing louder isn't effective. Yelling is really stupid, and you will lose respect instantly. Good directors do not yell.

Respect the other crew person. This goes both ways, of course. Do not dismiss his/her concerns, need for marks, safety, etc. Do not think that you are somehow superior because of your job title.

Do not think the Steadicam is a magic stick that will somehow overcome anyone's lack of forethought and planning, or correct mistakes of actors not hitting marks, etc.

If you want another take, explain why. That will put everyone on the crew on a clear (and energized) path to achieve what you want, rather than the energy-robbing and directionless "let's do anther."

Worse is "that sucked." or some such (again, directionless) nonsense. What good will come of doing the next take? What do you want to see that you didn't on the last take? What do you want to improve? Give us help to help you realize your vision. If your vision is cloudy... hmmm that's your job to fix.

Do not shoot the rehearsal, or if you do, and something goes wrong, please, please, please continue to rehearse the whole shot - don't force everyone to go back to one and never rehearse the whole thing.

Jerry
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#4 Ken Nguyen

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 12:20 AM

Please also explain in great detail about the types of steadicam rig being use.
Why one system is too much more expensive than the others (ebay...)

On one of the job, after finishing setting up the rig, the young-friendly-director slapped on on shoulder and asked: "What's a beautiful steadicam you have! Is it a Pilot or Flyer?"
Me: ......

On a job last month working as a camera-op, when the director called for a steadicam shot, I handed the RED over to the "steadicam-op",
who later mounted it on his Merlin!
The steadi-op is a closed friend of the director!
15min later, the director changed the shot to hand-held; more work for me!
At the end of the day, I asked the director why he picked the Merlin.
He replied that his friend showed him the thing with Steadicam® trade mark on it.
He though Steadicam® is steadicam; never seen one before!

Still have more funny stories about director and producer on steadicam equipment, but another time, got to go now.

Cheers,
Ken Nguyen.
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#5 Michael Shu

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 02:29 PM

Please also explain in great detail about the types of steadicam rig being use.
Why one system is too much more expensive than the others (ebay...)

On one of the job, after finishing setting up the rig, the young-friendly-director slapped on on shoulder and asked: "What's a beautiful steadicam you have! Is it a Pilot or Flyer?"
Me: ......

On a job last month working as a camera-op, when the director called for a steadicam shot, I handed the RED over to the "steadicam-op",
who later mounted it on his Merlin!
The steadi-op is a closed friend of the director!
15min later, the director changed the shot to hand-held; more work for me!
At the end of the day, I asked the director why he picked the Merlin.
He replied that his friend showed him the thing with Steadicam® trade mark on it.
He though Steadicam® is steadicam; never seen one before!

Still have more funny stories about director and producer on steadicam equipment, but another time, got to go now.

Cheers,
Ken Nguyen.


Whoa! What exactly happened when he picked up the Red One Merlin Rig (being a former Merlin owner that almost feels like any oxymoron)? Did it keel over super hard or did the gimbal collapse on itself?
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#6 chris fawcett

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 04:56 PM

[Whoa! What exactly happened when he picked up the Red One Merlin Rig (being a former Merlin owner that almost feels like any oxymoron)? Did it keel over super hard or did the gimbal collapse on itself?

Guess it would work in low-mode ;)
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