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Gyro DC-AC voltage converter


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#1 Nicholas Davidoff

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 11:57 PM

Can anybody explain the difference between the $400 AC/DC gyro voltage converter from Kenyon (here) and the $2,500 gyro voltage converter from GPI???
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#2 MarkKaravite

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 04:41 PM

Nick,

I'm also looking to put a gyro package together. I seem to be needing them more & more these days. Buzz Moyer was kind enough to let me use his gyro package for a 2nd unit vehicle rig. Buzz has the $400 Kenyon inverter, and it worked flawlessly. It's smaller than the PRO, & I was able to velcro it to the back of my monitor when I wanted to fly it. I imagine the PRO unit is much beefier & will last longer. The PRO also has an Anton Bauer mount, so you can run gyro shore power easily with a battery.

I think I'm going to go with the Kenyon inverter & K-4 gyros. For the limited times I need gyros, I can't justify $10K for a gyro package when I can get away cheaper, and it still works.

Maybe someone can chime in on any specific advantages to the PRO inverter.
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#3 Benjamin Treplin

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 10:44 AM

PRO inverter 2

pros:
- runs on 24V and 12v.
- can support up to 3 gyros.
- is mounted between A/B plate and battery.
- can be powered of a A/B battery or with a 24V or 12V power source.

cons:
- I think it is heavier than the Kenyon inverter. 550g to 650g. No good scale at hand.
- If you are not using A/B batteries and plates it's a bit hard to mount on the rig.

--

The gyros a are daisy chained to the inverter. You can only use the GPI modified gyros with it.

Keep in mind that the 12V Kenyon inverter doesn't like 14,4V. It will run hot and maybe get damaged.
Kenyon has a dedicated 14,4V inverter.
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#4 MarkKaravite

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:51 PM

That's good info, thanks Benjamin.
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#5 Nicholas Davidoff

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 01:29 AM

Thanks for the info guys.
Benjamin, what do you mean by, "Kenyon converter doesn't like 14.4 volts"? Does this mean that any voltage over 14.4 will blow a fuse? Or fry the inverter? Some of our AB batteries come hot of the charger at 14.6 and higher sometimes. Can you elaborate?
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#6 Benjamin Treplin

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 11:28 AM

I meant doesn't like 14.4V batteries.
The electric coil of the 12V converter is designed for the specific voltage range of 12V batteries (10V to 14,5V).
Using 14.4V batteries (13V to 16,8V) with a 12V converter leads to a higher output voltage, faster spinning gyros and the converter gets very hot. So hot the housing can suffer. Kenyon has a dedicated converter for 14.4V batteries.
A fellow operator ran into this problem (his housing deformed) and solved it with a voltage regulator and then bought a new converter.
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