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DVD's with "The making of...


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#1 Michael Stumpf

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Posted 22 January 2004 - 01:13 PM

do you guys think they are "demystifying" the film business?
Do you think when they show too much often they "give away" trade secrets and the "awe" of the film for audiences?

Just a thought, because when I was growing up, I was in awe of how they (filmmakers) did stuff. Now, audiences just have to watch the behind the scenes or "making of" and suddenly it looks easy and makes the audience go into other films with a different view point.

Could you imagine if they told everyone how they did the shot in Citizen Kane?
That shot has mystified people for decades and been talked about in film schools for generations. Now it would be like, "yeah, no biggie, they just did...."

What do yo think? Am I crazy for beginning to think that way?
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#2 Ruben Sluijter

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Posted 23 January 2004 - 03:13 AM

I do think a lot of the DVD extras that are available demystify some of the magic, I think that was bound to happen with the format of DVD.
But if you look at your average "making-off" it's usually just the actors and directors congratulating themselves on what is beyond doubt their best work yet (and certainly the most fun to work on!) with an occasional shot of someone yelling action, a clapperboard, a camera and the director staring at a monitor and saying cut.

To this date I haven't found that many making-off features that really show the making off a film (most of these featurettes are just promotional in nature)
When you do find one it's usually about the effects and what it took to create those.
If anything is demystifying it's the commentary tracks (which I love hearing) but most people tend to skip those because they find it boring, atleast that's the impression I get.

Peace, Ruben "Let's remake Citizen Kane with CGI shots and a cute sidekick!!!!" Sluijter
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#3 IanMcMillan

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Posted 23 January 2004 - 10:10 AM

Hey Ruben,
I have to agree. The best thing about DVD is the EPK guys are cleaning up. What used to be a 3 day gig is now taking as long as main unit. I can recommend the doccos on the Lawrence of Arabia DVD. These show how hard that crew worked. 15 grips pushing a dolly the size of a freight train.
Take care all
Ian Mc Millan (Macca)
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#4 RobVanGelder

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Posted 23 January 2004 - 10:52 AM

Well.... I just saw some interviews of the things behind the scenes from Vidocq and there was a lot of detailed info of how they did certain digital effects. It´s not that one could do that on his PC or Mac, but it showed a lot of interesting things. But it was also highly technical so I doubt if the average viewer is so interested.
Apart from that there is some, if not all AMAZING steadicam work from an Italian guy, whose name I forgot now but I will get back to that.

Rob van Gelder, Bangkok, Thailand
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#5 IanMcMillan

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Posted 23 January 2004 - 10:54 AM

Hey Robby
What are you doing in Thailand?
Ian mc Millan (Macca)
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#6 Brad Hruboska

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Posted 23 January 2004 - 01:31 PM

Unfortunately the extras are one of the main selling points of DVD's , all part of marketing, along with infotainment shows , E channel, Star Channel, etc. It is indeed one of the reasons I buy compilations and DVD's specifically with extras. Robert Rodriguez' extras on Once Upon A Time in Mexico are excellent and really demystify the whooe process of shooting, effects, as well as his very positive take on new technology. I am somewhat envious of his elaborate ( in home) setup with scoring, and editing all under one roof, and the immediacy of the idea to the work.
I just cringe a bit when his steadicam work is a bit, ahem wild.....its a different way to work, and I hope it brings more flexability to crews and production alike.
Definately worth a look on the rental...
:blink:
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#7 RobVanGelder

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Posted 24 January 2004 - 11:54 AM

Hey Robby
What are you doing in Thailand?
Ian mc Millan (Macca)

What I am doing in Thailand? , At the moment not much, except going to the Bangkok Film festival. I want to experience the asian film-style. As you might know I have done a big feature last year in Cambodia and Thailand and it has really made me rethink what and where I want to be. So I will this area in the next year. My equipment is already here and I want to explore more of this continent. Basically I will travel wherever there is work, and that is - at the moment - in short supply inHolland and Europe!


Rob van Gelder, Bangkok, Thailand
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