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making the change


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#1 robert weldoff

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 07:39 AM

hi all
sorry to ask stupid questions
but when i do a switch my post tends to lean away from me,
is it my operating hand putting to much pressure on post?
or not enough force from arm hand?
or my body posture? as in leaning?
i feel my body is correct but i dont know what is wrong?
does one make a big step to allow space for camera to glide past?

i have the book and dvd but i cant seem to figure out what im doing wrong?
any suggestions or comments would be appreciated

regards
rob
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#2 RonBaldwin

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 08:00 AM

hi all
sorry to ask stupid questions
but when i do a switch my post tends to lean away from me,
is it my operating hand putting to much pressure on post?
or not enough force from arm hand?
or my body posture? as in leaning?
i feel my body is correct but i dont know what is wrong?
does one make a big step to allow space for camera to glide past?

i have the book and dvd but i cant seem to figure out what im doing wrong?
any suggestions or comments would be appreciated

regards
rob



do it without touching the rig and see what it does (it will probably pan because of gimbal friction but you are talking about the shot going un-level right?). Your body position won't affect the post, it is supposed to be isolated by the gimbal. I can't do switches. I have never been good at them and just don't do them. I suck at don juan as well -- if you ever see me in don juan you know I'm having a really bad day!!
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#3 William Demeritt

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 01:13 PM

Robert,

Are you switching from walking backwards into Don Juan or vice versa?

If you perform the switch, and in the action, you find the post is leaning away from you, that makes me think during your switch, you're tipping your body into the direction you're switching.

Perhaps this scenario (assuming you operate normal and not goofy): you're operating walking backwards, and begin to switch into Don Juan:
1. you step back a bit further on your right foot.
2. you step back with your left foot, crossing the path of your rig, and the rig is briefly directly in front of you before it's on the "wrong" side of you" (for the direction you're facing).
3. you step back with your right foot and pivot on your left foot. you're now facing 180 degrees from your previous path, and the rig is still facing behind you.

During step 2, when you step away with your left foot, you may be pulling the gimbal in the direction of your step for a moment, causing a pendulum effect whereby the rig leans away.

Likewise, during step 2, even if your hand was off the gimbal, if you pitch left (direction of the step) then the rig will move left, causing the pendulum effect.

Ideally, during the switch, the path of the rig should not change direction or be otherwise influenced, and you should maintain proper operating attitude at all times.
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#4 robert weldoff

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:04 AM

Robert,

Are you switching from walking backwards into Don Juan or vice versa?

If you perform the switch, and in the action, you find the post is leaning away from you, that makes me think during your switch, you're tipping your body into the direction you're switching.

Perhaps this scenario (assuming you operate normal and not goofy): you're operating walking backwards, and begin to switch into Don Juan:
1. you step back a bit further on your right foot.
2. you step back with your left foot, crossing the path of your rig, and the rig is briefly directly in front of you before it's on the "wrong" side of you" (for the direction you're facing).
3. you step back with your right foot and pivot on your left foot. you're now facing 180 degrees from your previous path, and the rig is still facing behind you.

During step 2, when you step away with your left foot, you may be pulling the gimbal in the direction of your step for a moment, causing a pendulum effect whereby the rig leans away.

Likewise, during step 2, even if your hand was off the gimbal, if you pitch left (direction of the step) then the rig will move left, causing the pendulum effect.

Ideally, during the switch, the path of the rig should not change direction or be otherwise influenced, and you should maintain proper operating attitude at all times.





hi william
yes i operate regular, i it probably is my step i will try to keep as straight as possible.
thanks

Ron thanks for that at least i know im not the only one :unsure:
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#5 PeterAbraham

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 06:53 PM

Well said there, William. Might I add that if it isn't your body, focus in on your hand work. A superb gimbal will allow you to switch hands-free with virtually zero pan and absolutely zero sway. If you have roll in your gimbal when switching hands free, you have a problem.

The body work should keep the lens on the line ( so to speak ). The value of learning the switch on a line instead of during shots isn't' that you will ever DO a switch in 180* like that, but it allows one to ferociously zero in on what the body is doing, what the angle of the pelvis is doing, what the feet are doing, what the shoulders and torso are doing, what the head is doing, what the hands are doing.

Being quite critical of one's own form allows for improvement.

Me, I adore the Don Juan.

Charles, that's your cue..... B)

Here's one that I teach during the Steadicam Workshops. It's a rarely applied bit but my goodness does it make some people's brains happy.

If you are going to operate a shot that is 100% Don Juan, consider reversing the monitor/ battery configuration. That is to say, either spin the post or take off the camera and reverse it. ( Depending on what sled you fly ).

This allows one to keep "normal" operating approach to the sled intact while the camera is aimed behind one. Upside? For those who feel that The Don Juan™ is awkward, the monitor is where it always is. Downside? Well.... panning is the same since rotational direction isn't altered just because you moved the monitor. TILTING, on the other hand, becomes rather vexing.

I did this only once, just before I joined Tiffen. An entire day of interviews through Central Park for an ABC News/ Nightline segment. Hour after hour of long shots with few cuts. Made for a very happy day. Try it. Get the idea of it to sit well inside, and then when you face a very long D.J. shot, you might be comfortable enough with the trick to do it and operate facing forwards.

Here's the run-down on how to do it with Steadicams. It should only take a minute ( or less ) to switch elements and re-balance.

1. Pilot- flip plate 180*
2. Flyer LE- Loosen allen bolt head closest to centerpost. Rotate entire bottom of sled. Remember which way you went !! You do not risk damaging the cable harness by rotating it half way, as long as you remember to GO BACK the way you came. Otherwise, you can damage the harness. This bit applies to all rigs, regardless of make and model. You have cables up the post? Mind which way you spun your top to bottom post arrangement.
3. Zephyr and Scout- flip plate 180*
4. Archer on up to Ultra 2- Either flip plate 180 OR loosen clamp on lower post and rotate bottom most post segment along with monitor and battery assembly. Me, I'd leave the camera and plate along and rotate the bottom post assembly. The reason is that you'd have to re-plug all of the stuff in up top.

Hope this is helpful !

Peter Abraham
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#6 Andrew Stone

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 08:04 PM

Excellent tip Peter. Thanks for that and your enthusiasm.
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#7 robert weldoff

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 04:05 PM

If you have roll in your gimbal when switching hands free, you have a problem.


hi Peter
thanks for the reply

Do you mean a problem with me or with my gimbal?

if its my gimbal how would i test it to find out whats wrong/ok?

regards

Edited by robert weldoff, 27 September 2010 - 04:06 PM.

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#8 PeterAbraham

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 10:12 PM

You are so welcome for the answer.

It was a reference to any gimbals used in stabilizers that are not truely round.

Peter Abraham
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#9 robert weldoff

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 02:22 AM

hi Peter

thanks again

i will do some handsfree switches later and see what happens

regards
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