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3D HD light rig operating


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#1 Txema Zuriarrain

Txema Zuriarrain

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:12 AM

Hi everyone!

First of all thanks a lot to all of you who share your kwnoledge, experience and friendship in this Forum that allows, amongst other things, to increase our learning further workshops and Jerry's & Laurie's book, which I am reading, to newbies like me.

I seized the opportunity to introduce myself in my reply to Tim Tyler's "Account Retention Thread".

I had my first work one year ago, a month after the Steadicam Workshop I had attended. It was a 3D HD Live Broadcast in Barcelona. Just a few minutes of show and a few connections to the Steadicam I was slowly moving or locking-off, as I was told 3D resulting image on screen was so sensitive to movement.

I've had no more shots in 3D since then and tomorrow I'll have my second one. It's not a big thing at all - 2 Panasonic HS-300 cameras set in parallel -.

I will be recording a kind of performance of a battle that took place in the Spanish Civil War. No rehearsals, no cuts, no storyboards, nothing. Just an hour nonstop recording with my rig on. I asked the camera providers to make a camera rig in a range of 13 to 19 lbs, to get the most stability within the limit of my Flyer LE.

So weight won't be a problem, and as they will cut and use the images for a teaser, I will manage to have some non full stress moments.

I have just the general idea that pans and tilts must be very slow and that he best are straight movements in the lens axis, but I haven't made any test yet on that, so I would be really grateful for any advices on operating this 3D HD light rig - kind of movements, speed, any useful tip.

Best flights.


Txema.
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#2 Pedro Guimaraes SOC

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 12:33 PM

Keep framing on the loose side. Since you are shooting on a parallel rig they will be slipping the images in post to adjust convergence therefore they will be getting rid of the edges of the frame. So avoid having objects to close to right and left borders.

try not to give people "haircuts" keep things away from top boarder since if something is place in negative space and it touches a border you will have a "edge violation" in 3D speak.....so like I said, keep framing a bit loose.

Also like they said, slow pans, keep things smooth the usual stuff really.

Have fun! take some pictures.....
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#3 Txema Zuriarrain

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 03:37 PM

Hi, Pedro!

Since I will actually connect just one of the two cameras to my sled monitor I was aware that I will have the opposite side of the other camera frame missing in my monitor's frame.

But I wasn't aware that they will get rid of the edges of the whole frame, despite it's absolutely logical.

And I had never heard about the "edge violation", but after reading something about it just now I get it.

Your reply as been really useful. Thank you very much!

I'll try to survive under the bombs and take some pictures! Hahah!

Happy flights!


Txema.
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#4 Pedro Guimaraes SOC

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 01:03 AM

I'm a stereographer and do alot of 3D steadicam.

take a look on my site.....at this point I think I have had around 9 different 3D rigs/cameras on my steadicam....

Yes, once they slide the images to adjust convergence the scale IN so you loose both edges of frame. This is also why "depending" on what your shooting keeping your subject more towards the center is not bad thing. This gives more freedom in post to play with position of the "screen plane".
Usually there is not much difference from left camera view and right camera view, so It's not dangerous to shoot looking at single eye.

When we shoot 3D with RED 4k many times they "reframe" in post with pan/scan type operation to finalize artistic off center framing while avoiding any edge violations.

Main thing, (like usual) listen to your boss. The DP. Do what he says. If there is a 3D issue the stereographer will discuss with the DP. Your job is to keep things level and stable....naturally to give DP the framing HE wants. But when in doubt (especially if you close to what you shooting) center frame it.
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