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Mounting Bubble Levels


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#1 Tom Daigon

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 04:43 PM

Im not sure the appropriate forum to place this so "General" seems like a good home for it. I purchased the Mcmaster bubble levels (thanks to all the great info in that discussion).
I will be mounting some on the base of my GC X-45 post and on the Nebtek monitor I will soon receive. What is the best way to do this. Double back tape was my first thought but I thought..."Why not ask the experts/" So here I am. What would you folks suggest?
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#2 Andrew Stone

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 08:37 PM

Hi Tom,

What level(s) did you end up getting? I just read through some of the more recent threads on levels and see Eric's suggestion of this one

He didn't state if this was his high sensitivity level or his low one. Curious Tom if you are going for a multi-level solution or not.

Cheers,
Andrew
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#3 Tom Daigon

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 09:22 PM

Hi Tom,

What level(s) did you end up getting? I just read through some of the more recent threads on levels and see Eric's suggestion of this one

He didn't state if this was his high sensitivity level or his low one. Curious Tom if you are going for a multi-level solution or not.

Cheers,
Andrew


Hi Andrew:
Yes I got 2 different levels. The one you indicated which I believe is the high sensitivity level (2160A11) and the low sensitivity one (2160A36). I haven't figured out how I want to affix them yet, but I will put 2 highs on the sled bottom for balancing (one on the X axis and one on the z axis using the After Effects 3D space as a reference). Then I will put 2 ( hi and low) on the monitor for reference. I think Erics approach will be helpful. I will know more once I get them attached to the sled and monitor. Velcro with industrial adhesive has been suggested by someone on the HBS forum.
Tom

Edited by Tom Daigon, 20 April 2010 - 09:23 PM.

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#4 Andrew Stone

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 09:38 PM

Industrial Velcro. Pick up a box of it. Probably in the $10 to $15 range. Stuff I got comes in a strip roll. You can pick it up at most building supply/hardware places. Useful, useful stuff.

I am leery though of using it for attaching levels as it would be difficult, I believe, to get the level to maintain a true and consistent plane to the surface to which it is attached. I saw it mentioned elsewhere here that some strong adhesive goop can be used but the product wasn't specified.

The veteran ops hopefully will chime in.
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#5 Tom Daigon

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 09:39 PM

Andrew:
Tim on HBS suggested that he uses double sided banner tape cut to size. He made an observation that velcro could affect the level of the level ;-)
Tom
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#6 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 01:53 AM

Andrew:
Tim on HBS suggested that he uses double sided banner tape cut to size. He made an observation that velcro could affect the level of the level ;-)



So can tape. You want to crazy glue it
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#7 RonBaldwin

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 08:26 AM

I use that earthquake goop or bubble gum from whatever hot extra happens to be near at set-up. If you mount it permanently just make sure you check the monitor level with a level on the camera plate -- if your monitor arm or monitor isn't at the right angle it will read wrong as one tilts the monitor.

rb
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#8 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 08:52 AM

If you mount it permanently just make sure you check the monitor level with a level on the camera plate -- if your monitor arm or monitor isn't at the right angle it will read wrong as one tilts the monitor.



You always need to cross reference the Monitors level to the camera mounting plates level.
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#9 RonBaldwin

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 10:09 AM

If you mount it permanently just make sure you check the monitor level with a level on the camera plate -- if your monitor arm or monitor isn't at the right angle it will read wrong as one tilts the monitor.



You always need to cross reference the Monitors level to the camera mounting plates level.


cross referencing is very important -- you go from high to low mode or maybe even have to disassemble your rig to get in the case, just check/double check it when you put it together.

Seems most who have green screens pretty much leave their monitors in the same place/same angle all the time...all bets are off with LCS's. And don't assume the bottom of your sled is level with the camera (side to side or front to back) it often is not.
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#10 Tom Daigon

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 11:29 AM

Thanks for the tips everyone!
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#11 MarkKaravite

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Posted 27 June 2010 - 08:23 PM

I used an epoxy designed for both metal and plastic. It doesn't affect the level of the level, and you can get it off later without damaging your surface. I was afraid super glue might leave a mess.
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#12 RonBaldwin

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Posted 27 June 2010 - 08:27 PM

I used an epoxy designed for both metal and plastic. It doesn't affect the level of the level, and you can get it off later without damaging your surface. I was afraid super glue might leave a mess.


I used superglue for the first time and holy shiite does it stick FAST! Usually you can put the piece down then slide it one way or the other to the exact position you want...not so much with superglue. Oi! I think I'll need a crow bar to remove it.
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#13 Lawrence Karman

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 12:30 AM

I used an epoxy designed for both metal and plastic. It doesn't affect the level of the level, and you can get it off later without damaging your surface. I was afraid super glue might leave a mess.


I used superglue for the first time and holy shiite does it stick FAST! Usually you can put the piece down then slide it one way or the other to the exact position you want...not so much with superglue. Oi! I think I'll need a crow bar to remove it.



Think acetone dissolves crazy glue.
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