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900 fps high speed camera on Steadicam?


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#1 Mikael Kern

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 06:33 AM

A director is asking me to shoot 900 fps on Steadicam. Video camera NOT film. Anyone done that? Thoughts / experience with high speed video cameras much appreciated.

- Mikael Kern
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#2 Nikolay Kerezov

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 09:28 AM

I've don it less than a week ago(there is picture in this section few posts under this one).
What kind of camera are you going to use?
Other than power issues I don't see any problem.
Best!
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#3 Matt Burton

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 05:25 AM

At 900FPS you wouldn't need a steadicam ?
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#4 thomas-english

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 06:03 AM

Hows it going Matt? your touting a high speed camera nowadays aren't you? Hows that going?

I reckon if you want a lot of shot for a lot of action where you need to maintain resolution then yeah, Steadicam is great. I've done quite a bit of Phantom Steadicam with its funny power issues and granted... Your operating can get away with being far more jittery under some circumstances; nevertheless Steadicam is a great tool to give a director a lot of usable well framed footage to choose from. Far better than handheld or on a head when on a jumpy jumpy topsy turvey platform like a quad.
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#5 Matt Burton

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 06:55 AM

I agree totally what your saying actually Tom :D
I was rather badly making trying to make the point that at 900 fps + you need to be traveling rather fast to get any noticeable tracking movement into the image.
It's sometimes easier or more practical to hand hold/dolly the camera around.
Saying that as you mention steadicam is the perfect tool for vehicle mount high speed work where vibrations need canceling out. I'd love to do some more steadicam slomo in the future and it's looking likely i'll get plenty of opportunity to do this.

I took a couple of years out of steadicam work to further my skillset, I was faced with an incredibly difficult decision and it's all worked out for the best (to cut a long story short). I will probably writing about what i've been upto in the journal section as i'm returning to steadicam now with much anticipation, and I hope to see you all around soon :D

Edited by Matt Burton, 18 September 2010 - 06:58 AM.

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#6 MarkKaravite

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 08:30 PM

Mikael,

The Phantom flies well on Steadicam. Of course, make sure they have enough Cinemags to handle the day's recording needs. Regarding power, it has a proprietary power cable. It is best to have this cable made for your rig. If you can't then a good backup is to order the mount for an Anton Bauer battery. The Phantom run times are pretty good with a Hytron 140. I know it's a 5.5lb battery, but the camera doesn't weigh that much, so not a deal breaker.

Abel Cine Tech is really a great source for Phantom rentals & accessories like the battery mount. Steve Romano is a great Phantom tech I've used out of New York. Contact me if you need his number.
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