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Buying a vest to start out


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#1 Michael Nelson

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 12:49 AM

I am a steadi-newb and have been working under a few different operators and a few different rigs. I'm in no place to spend the kind of money needed for a decent rig that will be a long term investment. I have a good connection for renting at a great price and will take advantage of it for as long as I can.

Would it make sense for me to invest in a vest for myself? That way I can get a consistent fit no matter what job I do and no matter which rig I happen to be using. Also, the vest will be able to stay with me for years as I work more and will integrate with a rig I may buy a few years down the road.

Thoughts?
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#2 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 01:10 AM

I'm not sure that getting a vest first is the right move.

HOWEVER, when you get a vest get the best one you can possibly afford and the one that fits and feels right for you. Like a pair of shoes, your vest and you mold / marry to each other; it's the direct interface to your body.

When I bought my first Clipper I upgraded to an Ultra vest and kept that vest when I bought the second rig since it was broken in and fit to me and I didn't want to go back through the break-in process.

As a recent example last week I put my arm and vest in for a cleaning thinking not much would be going on this week. Hah! Sure enough I got booked. Tiffen was kind enough to send me a loaner vest and arm on super short notice and sure enough the new demo vest feels completely foreign, as in not even close. Better than no vest though and hats off to Tiffen for busting out loaners to me ten minutes before closing on Friday.

The PRO vests are very nice too and I like the sleek design, the Klassen vests are legendary as well. Shop your vest until you find one that fits great to start and only gets better with age. Workshops are a great place to try a wide range of vests.
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#3 Janice Arthur

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 04:04 PM

Mike;

You mentioned you use a variety of rigs. The socket blocks are different depending on rig. (Yes I know some of the hole patterns are the same which makes them interchangeable.)

So the issue to me would be which vest would you buy? Lots of rig levels and lots of rig weights.

I think you need to use rigs for a year or two more, see where your jobs lie and then maybe start to think of purchase.

Like Robert said maybe a workshop would be a better way to spend your money if you haven't already.

JA
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#4 Michael Nelson

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 09:40 PM

I attended a workshop last March in Lake arrowhead and it was very beneficial. I got to try all of the vests steadicam makes there, in addition to the master series vest I use from time to time here and a Klassen vest I've used. I LOVED the klassen. The owner who let me use it was about my size so it was close to the right fit. I would like to get one at some point.
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#5 Kyle Blackman

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 10:45 AM

Mike I feel your best option is to build your own vest using a leather belt and some shoe laces... maybe some duct tape as well for added rigidity.

And the secret to getting jobs with you brand new custom vest is to spray paint it neon pink with purple accents!!! :P
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#6 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 07:03 PM

Mike I feel your best option is to build your own vest using a leather belt and some shoe laces... maybe some duct tape as well for added rigidity.

And the secret to getting jobs with you brand new custom vest is to spray paint it neon pink with purple accents!!! :P


How did you hear about my top secret new vest design? Just so you know it is patented and my lawyer is ready with a tube of lisigav for anyone who violates it!
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#7 Kyle Blackman

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 03:02 PM

Mike I feel your best option is to build your own vest using a leather belt and some shoe laces... maybe some duct tape as well for added rigidity.

And the secret to getting jobs with you brand new custom vest is to spray paint it neon pink with purple accents!!! :P


How did you hear about my top secret new vest design? Just so you know it is patented and my lawyer is ready with a tube of lisigav for anyone who violates it!



I didnt want to tell anyone (job security) that a tube of lisigav coating the entire vest helps keep the paint from chipping off... but does attract a lot of sand ;)
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#8 Erwin Landau

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 05:01 PM

Hi Michael,

It seams that you did the right first couple of steps. Taking the workshop etc.

So you are at the next step... buying equipment or at least starting to.

I would suggest to buy a new Vest that is build for you and your body type and fits properly from the get go and by pass the used market on that.( If that's what you really want to do for a living). It's like buying somebody's old sneakers (but that's just me and many will jump in and refute it). I know several ops that still own there first vest and still use it on a daily bases, Colin Anderson comes to mind. Usually the number of rigs somebody owned is considerably higher then the number of Vests. Yes it will cost you $4-5K but that's it, you spend it once and you might not buy one through out your carrier (exempt for the obligate service, repairs, etc.). I might still own my first PRO vest if it hadn't been for the break in... oh well.

I personally started with an original 3A that I had access from the local rental house (Thanks DEnny Clairmont) and later used a master for practice and on my first workshop. That's were I developed the dislike for that style of vest and the sweat that came from other ops... having to basically start from scratch adjusting the vest every single time I wanted to get into the rig.

After the workshop I developed the contacts to have access to other ops' gear. Getting the whole rig for practice was never the problem, it was always the Vest that was the hick up. Either I couldn't get it or I was not allowed to change anything on it. Even just turning the socket block over was a big deal to most ops... that's how I changed how I operated... I used to be goofy foot... (As I found out on my first work shop).
I am still baffled that I was able to talk Charles or Colin into letting me borrow theres... And stunned that Chris Haarhoff offered and let me use his for several shoots after mine was stolen to bridge the gap until my new Vest was build....

Anyhow...

As soon as I had the possibility and ability i went in for George to measure me up... and haven't looked back since.

That's what I suggest to newbies when they ask me. And I have yet to get a complained from the guys that did as I suggested... But I am getting a lot of : Oh I should have listened to you! When they didn't... Every time.


You can spend your money twice by buying a beat up used one and about a year into it for a brand new one or just skip the first step... It never fails. And if you decide to sell it in a years time you still get most of your money back.
Your call.


Just my two cents.


Erwin
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#9 Brian Freesh

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 05:15 PM

(Thanks Danny Clairmont)


Denny! Some thanks, can't even get his name right! :)
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#10 Erwin Landau

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 06:15 PM

If that's your only complaint...

Even had him in my address book that way for the last decade or so, he never complained.

Oh well... can't make it right for everybody.


later,

Irvin

(as I am known for most of the people in my professional life that don't bother to check... And I don't care as long as the check clears)
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#11 Brian Freesh

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 09:26 PM

If that's your only complaint...

Even had him in my address book that way for the last decade or so, he never complained.

Oh well... can't make it right for everybody.


later,

Irvin

(as I am known for most of the people in my professional life that don't bother to check... And I don't care as long as the check clears)



Not a complaint, only messin'

-Brett Fresh (all the time)
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#12 Erwin Landau

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 09:38 PM

My humor to dry for ya?

Later,


Irvine Landlow

(As credited on the DVD for "Underground")
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#13 Brian Freesh

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 12:28 PM

My humor to dry for ya?



Quite possibly. I was on the fence.

-Brin, Brent, Ryan

Also, I apologetically have absolutely no advice to give regarding the topic of this thread
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#14 Matt Petrosky

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 04:43 AM

Irvine Landlow


I think I worked with her once! Cool. :P
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#15 Michael Nelson

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 04:00 PM

Mike I feel your best option is to build your own vest using a leather belt and some shoe laces... maybe some duct tape as well for added rigidity.

And the secret to getting jobs with you brand new custom vest is to spray paint it neon pink with purple accents!!! :P


I see there letting anyone in this forum nowadays! Thanks for the advise, Mr. Blackman


Hi Michael,

It seams that you did the right first couple of steps. Taking the workshop etc.

So you are at the next step... buying equipment or at least starting to.

I would suggest to buy a new Vest that is build for you and your body type and fits properly from the get go and by pass the used market on that.( If that's what you really want to do for a living). It's like buying somebody's old sneakers (but that's just me and many will jump in and refute it). I know several ops that still own there first vest and still use it on a daily bases, Colin Anderson comes to mind. Usually the number of rigs somebody owned is considerably higher then the number of Vests. Yes it will cost you $4-5K but that's it, you spend it once and you might not buy one through out your carrier (exempt for the obligate service, repairs, etc.). I might still own my first PRO vest if it hadn't been for the break in... oh well.

I personally started with an original 3A that I had access from the local rental house (Thanks DEnny Clairmont) and later used a master for practice and on my first workshop. That's were I developed the dislike for that style of vest and the sweat that came from other ops... having to basically start from scratch adjusting the vest every single time I wanted to get into the rig.

After the workshop I developed the contacts to have access to other ops' gear. Getting the whole rig for practice was never the problem, it was always the Vest that was the hick up. Either I couldn't get it or I was not allowed to change anything on it. Even just turning the socket block over was a big deal to most ops... that's how I changed how I operated... I used to be goofy foot... (As I found out on my first work shop).
I am still baffled that I was able to talk Charles or Colin into letting me borrow theres... And stunned that Chris Haarhoff offered and let me use his for several shoots after mine was stolen to bridge the gap until my new Vest was build....

Anyhow...

As soon as I had the possibility and ability i went in for George to measure me up... and haven't looked back since.

That's what I suggest to newbies when they ask me. And I have yet to get a complained from the guys that did as I suggested... But I am getting a lot of : Oh I should have listened to you! When they didn't... Every time.


You can spend your money twice by buying a beat up used one and about a year into it for a brand new one or just skip the first step... It never fails. And if you decide to sell it in a years time you still get most of your money back.
Your call.


Just my two cents.


Erwin


Thank you very much for the advise!
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