Jump to content



Photo

How about something like that under the vest?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Matteo Quagliano

Matteo Quagliano

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 423 posts

Posted 15 October 2009 - 07:30 AM

Hi fellow ops,

here's a suggestion from another op not present on this forum.

Is it a good idea to wear something like this under your vest?

[attachment=4436:707_Work...O_GRANDE.jpg]

It's a moto/sport supporting system so it should not interfere with operating and moving but it's just an extra help to keep the back straight.

Thoughts?

mq
  • 0

#2 Charles King

Charles King

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 343 posts
  • Sweden

Posted 15 October 2009 - 08:27 AM

I think it is a good idea, especially if you have problems with your back. Personally, I bought an on-the-fly adjustable lumbar belt which I am working on incorporating into my front vest. I tested at IBC this gone September an it feels great. I immediately purchased one direct from them. I got an exhibition discount as well.
  • 0

#3 Matteo Quagliano

Matteo Quagliano

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 423 posts

Posted 15 October 2009 - 08:42 AM

Thank you very much Charles,

I was hoping for a quick and positive answer and you beat them all... I'm on a RED job with 2 motors (iris and focus), all in as Low as possible Mode (a dog POV), all short film shot on steadicam (it's a subjective of a dog from beginning to end) and big part of it is going to be outdoor on the field. It sounds like a nice challenge, it's my first heavy setup (a part lightweight betacam with 2 mics for around 10kg) that's why I'm thinking for the support thing.

And you support my supporting idea... :)

ciao
mq
  • 0

#4 Nikolay Kerezov

Nikolay Kerezov

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 144 posts
  • Sofia;Bulgaria

Posted 15 October 2009 - 12:45 PM

I'm using similar as well!
I'm not going out there without my belt,planing to buy second ,so no stincky stuff around....
  • 0

#5 Charles King

Charles King

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 343 posts
  • Sweden

Posted 15 October 2009 - 06:14 PM

Matteo, this is what I bought. It is adjustable on the fly by simply turning the knob on the side of the belt until it tightens up. This way you can fine tune the adjustmentsd accordenly to the strength. I think this is a great idea for Tiffen to use on their front mounted vest. Here is the link:

http://www.bodybuild...rtbackbelt.html.

I suggest you try it out. It works great. Being an individual who likes to modify things I trying to figure out a way to incoporate it into the vest. It wouls be good to start with a smaller size to be able to incoporate rachets. tick tick tick...My head is churning ;)

Edited by Charles King, 15 October 2009 - 06:17 PM.

  • 0

#6 thomas-english

thomas-english

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1165 posts
  • UK

Posted 16 October 2009 - 03:23 AM

I used to use these on my front mounted 3a vest but stopped on my Walter Klassen. I think they are cool but no substitute for good postural exercise.
  • 0

#7 Ken Nguyen

Ken Nguyen

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 245 posts
  • California & Viet Nam

Posted 16 October 2009 - 03:58 AM

Gent,
It might not be a good choice.
Think about: 4 to 5 hrs long concert, in the mid of summer in Asia, Death Valley - CA, humidity of rain forest, and many more hot/humid conditions/locations.
The vest itself (front & back) is designed from and based from the back-support device.
By itself, the vest is a "non-light weight-comfortable" back support device.
You don't need to wear another one with it.
By wearing it, the flow of the blood down to your legs might be restricted also.
Your upper body movement might also be restricted as well.

Wear your vest properly, exercise regularly, fly with a good form, you will be OK.
Ken.
  • 0

#8 Charles King

Charles King

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 343 posts
  • Sweden

Posted 17 October 2009 - 03:56 AM

Gent,
It might not be a good choice.
Think about: 4 to 5 hrs long concert, in the mid of summer in Asia, Death Valley - CA, humidity of rain forest, and many more hot/humid conditions/locations.
The vest itself (front & back) is designed from and based from the back-support device.
By itself, the vest is a "non-light weight-comfortable" back support device.
You don't need to wear another one with it.
By wearing it, the flow of the blood down to your legs might be restricted also.
Your upper body movement might also be restricted as well.

Wear your vest properly, exercise regularly, fly with a good form, you will be OK.
Ken.


Personally Ken the part about wearing the vest correctly has nothing to do with someone having a bad back. Regardless of how good your posture is and the proper use of manner of wearing the vest, you will still have the back problem; with or without the steadicam vest. If the individual did not have a bad back from the beginning than your statement will be true.
As I have a slight issue with my lower left side region( thought firstly to be from flying the rig); having something like this, helps to sturdy my posture and support I will need to properly wear the vest and fly the rig. This problem I've always had, even before my interest in the Steadicam.

Also, I mentioned that the one I am using can be incorporated into the Steadicam vest just like the lumbar that they use on the rear of the vest. Only difference is that it can be adjusted on the fly by a small knob, to increase and release the pressure according to the operator's personal adjustments.

Edited by Charles King, 17 October 2009 - 04:00 AM.

  • 0

#9 chris fawcett

chris fawcett

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1016 posts
  • Europe

Posted 18 October 2009 - 06:46 AM

Hi All,

I don't recommend these postural supports. They might feel good in the short term, but they probably lead to a weakening of your postural muscles, and not just the main erectors, but the small stabilizers like the intervertebral multifidus too. Anyone that's had a limb in a cast can testify to an extreme example of this weakening.

I suspect it's really best to let your muscles do the work. Your back will become strong enough though operating in good posture. I have a double slipped disk. L5-S1 that hurts sometimes. My solution is to strap myself into a Steadicam for a few hours. That might sound counterintuitive, and I sometimes can't believe it myself, but having those super-trained back muscles means that my disks are not compressed like they would be if I have weak back muscles.

I'm not a doctor of course, so take everything I say with a grain of valium. Also, I must admit to a general suspicion of postural support quackery in general, but you'll hopefully forgive me that.

:)

Chris
  • 0

#10 Charles King

Charles King

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 343 posts
  • Sweden

Posted 18 October 2009 - 07:59 AM

Really Chris - A double slip disc?? You're brave man. :) I suppose if you can break through the barrier then I can do it too. But what I meant from my explanation was the incorporating of the on-the-fly adjustment of the lumbar waist band, I posted, into the steadicam vest. The vest already includes a lumbar pad on the back but my suggestion was to replace that with something of this function and design. But again, this is only an idea and left to those who agree or not agree with this suggestion. ;) Just thinking of expanding an idea that is all. :)

Edited by Charles King, 18 October 2009 - 08:01 AM.

  • 0

#11 Jess Haas SOC

Jess Haas SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1145 posts
  • Culver City, CA

Posted 18 October 2009 - 08:16 PM

Chris- your not the only one whose back feels better from Steadicam. I have a suspicion that it might actually have something to do with a muscular inbalance of sorts. Strong back muscles tightening the back without comparitevely strong ab muscles in front to tighten the front. Throw the steadicam up and the strong back muscles make sense, without it things are a little out of wack. Just a wild theory, been meaning to work on my abs some more regardless.

~Jess
  • 0

#12 chris fawcett

chris fawcett

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1016 posts
  • Europe

Posted 19 October 2009 - 04:19 AM

Hi Charles,

Sorry if I misunderstood you there. Certainly something of the sort you describe would be well worth looking into, and you are just the man for the job :) I'll be fascinated to hear your findings. My suspicion is, however, that we should leave that region as much as possible alone to do its own thing, find its own balance, etc.

Jess,

Have you read the 'tensegrity' theory of the spine (nothing to do with Carlos Castanada's misappropriation of the term, but based on Buckminster Fuller's principle of tensional integrity). The article is (shameless self-publicity follows) here. This is the only explanation of how the spine works that makes sense to me—strong back muscles relieve pressure on disks. From having been in a position of being offered an operation to fuse my vertebrae some years ago, I have reverted to the fully-mad, dumb-ass risk taker that I was in my my misspelt yuff. Steadicam rules!

Fly erect!

Chris
  • 0

#13 Bryan Fowler

Bryan Fowler

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 370 posts
  • Chattanooga, TN

Posted 19 October 2009 - 11:24 AM

Fly erect!


uh....ok?
  • 0

#14 Kevin Andrews SOC

Kevin Andrews SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 348 posts
  • Denver CO

Posted 19 October 2009 - 11:54 AM

Fly erect!


uh....ok?



Always :lol:
  • 0




Betz Tools for Stabilizers

rebotnix Technologies

Omnishot Systems

Varizoom Follow Focus

Paralinx LLC

Engineered Cinema Solutions

IDX

Boland Communications

GPI Pro Systems

Wireless Video Systems

PLC Electronics Solutions

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

PLC - Bartech

BOXX

SkyDreams

Teradek