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Now this looks promising


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#1 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 03:13 PM

It would be great for someone like Anton Bauer to build some battery assemblies out of these bad boys:

Sony Launches High-power, Long-life Lithium Ion Secondary Battery
Using Olivine-type Lithium Iron Phosphate as the Cathode Material



Sony Corporation today announced that it has launched a new type of lithium ion secondary battery that combines high-power and long-life performance, using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode material. Shipment commenced in June 2009.

The Olivine-type lithium iron phosphate used in this new battery is extremely suited for use as a cathode material due to its robust crystal structure and stable performance, even at high temperatures. By combining this new cathode material with Sony's proprietary particle design technology that minimizes electrical resistance to deliver high power output, and also leveraging the cell structure design technology Sony accrued developing its current "Fortelion series" lithium ion secondary battery line-up, Sony has realized a high power density of 1800W/kg and extended life span of approximately 2,000 charge-discharge cycles.

Furthermore, with this new battery able to charge rapidly, in addition to providing a stable discharge of voltage, it will first be supplied for use in motor driven devices such as power tools, after which its application will be expanded to a wide range of other mobile electronic devices. With lithium ion secondary batteries able to deliver both compact size and high capacity, their usage continues to diversify and grow. By adding this high-power, long-life lithium ion secondary battery to its lineup, Sony will aim to continue to provide batteries optimized to its customers' requirements, and further strengthen its lithium ion secondary battery business going forward.



Cell Type

Capacity

Date of shipment

Lithium ion secondary battery with
high-power and long-life performance Cylindrical 18650 1.1Ah June, 2009


‹Main Features›
1. Power density: 1800W/kg (20A continuous discharge)
2. Long-life: more than 80% capacity retention after 2,000 charge-discharge cycles
3. Rapid charging: 99% charge completed in 30 minutes


‹Details of Main Features›
1. Power density: 1800W/kg (20A continuous discharge)

Sony has leveraged its proprietary particle design technology that realizes high power by minimizing electrical resistance, together with the cell structure design technology it accrued developing its current lithium ion secondary battery line-up to successfully achieve high-power density of 1800W/kg. This enables the new battery to discharge large currents, while also providing a stable output of voltage, making it highly suitable for use in motor driven applications such as power tools.

2. Long-life; more than 80% capacity retention after 2,000 charge-discharge cycles)

This new battery delivers an extended life-span of over four-times existing secondary lithium ion batteries used in conventional electronic devices (G-series, A-series) due to the olivine-type lithium iron phosphate's robust crystal structure, and Sony's proprietary particle design technology. Its enhanced durability makes this new battery ideal for use in a wide range of mobile electronic devices.

3. Rapid charging; 99% charge is completed in 30 minutes

This new battery can be charged to 99% of its full capacity in 30 minutes, which represents approximately half the charge time of Sony's current lithium ion battery line-up (G-series, A-series), which mainly use cobalt oxide based cathodes.

‹Key Specifications›
Cell type Cylindrical type 18650
Size Diameter 18mm, height 65mm
Capacity (0.2ItA) 1.1Ah
Nominal Voltage 3.2V
Energy Density 95Wh/kg
Power Density 1800W/kg
Max. continuous discharge current 20A
Weight 40g


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#2 Dan Ayers

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 04:38 PM

I've been experimenting with Lithium Iron Phosphate. I have 3 PRO 1 batteries built and have been testing them on some shows I've been dayplaying on. They are lighter, and work for a really long time. I want to go to Panavision and test it on the Genesis. It does die pretty fast but after almost two hours. It is in the early stages of testing, but so far they work great. My Pag chargers charge them and once I get to use them on higher load cameras I'll let you all know.
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#3 Nicholas Davidoff

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 05:14 PM

If these were soon available in a "C" sized cell (which they likely will be), could you theoretically re-cell your Anton Bauer Hytron's or Trimpacs using these cells? Would you be able to charge them on your AB charger? I've re-celled my Trimpacs with new Ni-cad cells and they've been working great on an AB charger for over a year.
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#4 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 06:46 PM

its not a capacity question (its the same) its a cycle count improvement and RAPID recharge ability
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#5 pauldudeck

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 05:25 PM

If these were soon available in a "C" sized cell (which they likely will be), could you theoretically re-cell your Anton Bauer Hytron's or Trimpacs using these cells? Would you be able to charge them on your AB charger? I've re-celled my Trimpacs with new Ni-cad cells and they've been working great on an AB charger for over a year.


Guys,

I would STRONGLY recommend against using any cell inside of a battery, other than what is originally put in by the manufacturer. This goes for any type of battery, not just Anton/Bauer batteries. Recelling a Trimpac 14 with a higher capacity NiCad cell might be OK. But, putting a different chemistry cell inside of a battery that it is not designed for is NOT SAFE.

All Anton/Bauer batteries have "nameplates" on them (microprocessor) which identify them to the charger. And, as you know, each chemistry of battery needs to be charged in a specific way. So, if you try and charge a lithium ion battery like a NiCad, you are asking for trouble........most likely in the means of a fire. This is not something that should even be experimented with. Even if you replace the cells, the electronics package will still think it is the original cell chemistry and charge it as such. You can over-charge a NiCad or NiMH cell, but if you go over 16.8v on a lithium ion, you can have a fire......

I can guarantee that any manufacturer will tell you the same.

Paul
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#6 Nicholas Davidoff

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 08:59 PM

If these were soon available in a "C" sized cell (which they likely will be), could you theoretically re-cell your Anton Bauer Hytron's or Trimpacs using these cells? Would you be able to charge them on your AB charger? I've re-celled my Trimpacs with new Ni-cad cells and they've been working great on an AB charger for over a year.


Guys,

I would STRONGLY recommend against using any cell inside of a battery, other than what is originally put in by the manufacturer. This goes for any type of battery, not just Anton/Bauer batteries. Recelling a Trimpac 14 with a higher capacity NiCad cell might be OK. But, putting a different chemistry cell inside of a battery that it is not designed for is NOT SAFE.

All Anton/Bauer batteries have "nameplates" on them (microprocessor) which identify them to the charger. And, as you know, each chemistry of battery needs to be charged in a specific way. So, if you try and charge a lithium ion battery like a NiCad, you are asking for trouble........most likely in the means of a fire. This is not something that should even be experimented with. Even if you replace the cells, the electronics package will still think it is the original cell chemistry and charge it as such. You can over-charge a NiCad or NiMH cell, but if you go over 16.8v on a lithium ion, you can have a fire......

I can guarantee that any manufacturer will tell you the same.

Paul


Thanks Paul. Good to know.
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#7 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 09:22 PM

Guys,

I would STRONGLY recommend against using any cell inside of a battery, other than what is originally put in by the manufacturer. This goes for any type of battery, not just Anton/Bauer batteries. Recelling a Trimpac 14 with a higher capacity NiCad cell might be OK. But, putting a different chemistry cell inside of a battery that it is not designed for is NOT SAFE.

All Anton/Bauer batteries have "nameplates" on them (microprocessor) which identify them to the charger. And, as you know, each chemistry of battery needs to be charged in a specific way. So, if you try and charge a lithium ion battery like a NiCad, you are asking for trouble........most likely in the means of a fire. This is not something that should even be experimented with. Even if you replace the cells, the electronics package will still think it is the original cell chemistry and charge it as such. You can over-charge a NiCad or NiMH cell, but if you go over 16.8v on a lithium ion, you can have a fire......

I can guarantee that any manufacturer will tell you the same.

Paul



Thanks Paul.

I'm just interested in the longer cycle life and faster charge (Meaning I need fewer batteries!)
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#8 pauldudeck

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 01:09 PM

Thanks Paul.

I'm just interested in the longer cycle life and faster charge (Meaning I need fewer batteries!)
[/quote]


Eric,

Between you, me the wall (and everyone else), the performance of the Dionic HC will outperform this cell. It has a higher voltage and higher capacity per cell, almost double, so you'd get twice the run-time in the same size package. We are always doing life cycle testing on cells and batteries, and you guys will be very happy with the results of the Dionic HC's..........I need not say more.

And, this new type of lithium ion battery would mean a new charger for you guys, as in order to charge a battery in 30 minutes, you need a charger with a super-duper power supply in it.

As many of you know, we are working with Toshiba and their SCiB cell, which can be re-charged in as little as 20 minutes, but this too would need a new charger. Of course a new charger would still be able to charge all current Anton/Bauer batteries too, so its not that bad of a thing. The only thing is the only cell available right now is only 65wh, so the run-time is not there yet......

Paul
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