Jump to content



Photo

suggestion for a 2nd step in my career


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 gabriele gallareto

gabriele gallareto

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 15 July 2009 - 07:36 AM

Hi,
I'm a camera oprator (mostly video),
I attended the tiffen UK 3day workshop and actually i'm renting a satchler dvpro (the flyer equivalent) for my works.
Actually i'm not so sastified with my technique but i'm quite convinced to can improve, so I would like to buy a rig to practice and solving the question "can I be a really god steadiman?".
I'm not in the possibility to buy a big rig but i had a offer for a used flyer LE in optimal working condition for 5000 euros that i can afford (but it will be a big investment for me).
Any suggestion? In case of need is it easy to sell a used flyer LE for near 5000 euros to recover my money?
For what i tryed at the workshop the flyer "fly" like a big rig, so it look possible to learn on it and then rent a 3A if arrive big guy work, is it right?
Suggestions?

Ciao to all from Torino Italy

Gabriele
  • 0

#2 Fabrizio Sciarra SOC ACO

Fabrizio Sciarra SOC ACO

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 240 posts
  • London,UK

Posted 15 July 2009 - 08:37 AM

Hi Gabriele,
yes, the flyer is extremely easy to resell, and if you buy a used unit you won't loose much of your investment.
But ask yourself what you'll might fly in the next few years, and then decide based on the weight limit...
As per rentals I would choose something better than a 3A, why you should rent such an old rig? I mean, nothing wrong with it but being a rental you can go for a better rig without breaking your finances.
hope it helps
best
F
  • 0

#3 Kevin Andrews SOC

Kevin Andrews SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 348 posts
  • Denver CO

Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:23 AM

Hi,
I'm a camera oprator (mostly video),
I attended the tiffen UK 3day workshop and actually i'm renting a satchler dvpro (the flyer equivalent) for my works.
Actually i'm not so sastified with my technique but i'm quite convinced to can improve, so I would like to buy a rig to practice and solving the question "can I be a really god steadiman?".
I'm not in the possibility to buy a big rig but i had a offer for a used flyer LE in optimal working condition for 5000 euros that i can afford (but it will be a big investment for me).
Any suggestion? In case of need is it easy to sell a used flyer LE for near 5000 euros to recover my money?
For what i tryed at the workshop the flyer "fly" like a big rig, so it look possible to learn on it and then rent a 3A if arrive big guy work, is it right?
Suggestions?

Ciao to all from Torino Italy

Gabriele



I can speak on this since I've been using a Flyer LE for a lot of broadcast work lately. I find it behaves like a big rig ONLY when you ad a weight plate to bring up the camera package to the 19lb limit. Otherwise it is very touchy and can't completely absorb your steps. Still a very nice rig though.

I think it could be a great starter rig for the price, but please please get a weight plate and run at the highest weight. You won't regret it.

Look at my site www.kandrews.tv All of that steadicam work is done on an LE.

Good luck and have fun!
  • 0

#4 matt allsop

matt allsop

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • UK

Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:22 AM

Hi there,

I am selling a Glidecam V25 - I was in your position about 3 years ago and went with instinct. I am extremly happy I went down the steadicam route now. The rig is similar to the Flyer - can carry a little more if you are doing larger work. It flew a RED 2 weeks ago for a day and was very impressed with it.

Either way the flyer and V25 are great rigs to learn and earn on. I am taking the plunge with an Ultra within the week hence the sale. Email me on mail@mattallsop.com if you are interested I am sure we could sort something out.

Regards

Matt
  • 0

#5 Mike Germond SOC

Mike Germond SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 468 posts
  • Orlando Steadicam LLC

Posted 15 August 2009 - 10:18 PM

I can also speak on the Flyer LE, since all of my career work has been on it thus far. Mr. Andrews is exactly right. My best experience shooting with this rig was when I had it totally maxed out such that the arm sections were barely above horizontal when cranked as high as possible. I had manufactured my own weight plate which came in at about 13lbs, but for the first time was able to load the camera with enough accessories to max out the arm.
  • 0

#6 Charles Papert

Charles Papert

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2224 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 August 2009 - 05:38 AM

I've found my Flyer arm (2nd gen) to work pretty nicely even at middle loads, isolation-wise. Certainly the sled handles better with more weight but that is simple physics.

Many of those who start with lighter rigs and develop good skills and form (very easy to cheat on certain things with lightweight rigs, like not bothering to keep it close to your body) seem to enjoy using larger rigs down the road, because the added inertia makes operating "easier" in many regards. However, the added burden on the body can be an eye-opener if you are not in condition for it.
  • 0

#7 Afton Grant

Afton Grant

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • New York, Boston

Posted 16 August 2009 - 07:26 AM

(very easy to cheat on certain things with lightweight rigs, like not bothering to keep it close to your body)


This is a great point. At the workshop in Rockport, ME recently, a couple of the students already owned Pilots or Flyers and had developed the habit of operating with the rig in front of them rather to the side. Obviously, this is immediately found to be improper as soon as a larger rig is put on, and it took about two days of solid practicing to break that habit.
  • 0

#8 Brian Freesh

Brian Freesh

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 922 posts
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 16 August 2009 - 10:12 AM

I will occasionally throw the lightest camera I can onto my 2nd gen flyer to test myself. I've found that by getting good with so little inertia means I'm great when I have more inertia. I agree with Charles on isolation of the arm. Doesn't seem to matter how much weight I have, my steps aren't visible in general, though I'm sure I slip up from time to time.
  • 0

#9 Kevin Andrews SOC

Kevin Andrews SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 348 posts
  • Denver CO

Posted 17 August 2009 - 11:01 PM

I've found my Flyer arm (2nd gen) to work pretty nicely even at middle loads, isolation-wise. Certainly the sled handles better with more weight but that is simple physics.

Many of those who start with lighter rigs and develop good skills and form (very easy to cheat on certain things with lightweight rigs, like not bothering to keep it close to your body) seem to enjoy using larger rigs down the road, because the added inertia makes operating "easier" in many regards. However, the added burden on the body can be an eye-opener if you are not in condition for it.


Yes, getting the Flyer sled heavy is what I meant. If it happens to max out the arm, then that just goes with the territory. Flyer sled feels good with a weight plate added and two dionics or idx.

I'm pretty sure I was abusing the light rig and keeping the sled further out that usual. My last gig with a loaded Varicam on my efp had me bumping the sled battery more than once as I tried to keep it nice and close.
  • 0

#10 Keith Francis SOC

Keith Francis SOC

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • New Orleans

Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:49 AM

Kevin, I tried the link to see your LE work and had no luck. Is your URL still the same?

Cheers,

Keith
  • 0

#11 Nick Tsamandanis

Nick Tsamandanis

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 62 posts

Posted 09 September 2009 - 09:04 PM

(very easy to cheat on certain things with lightweight rigs, like not bothering to keep it close to your body)


This is a great point. At the workshop in Rockport, ME recently, a couple of the students already owned Pilots or Flyers and had developed the habit of operating with the rig in front of them rather to the side. Obviously, this is immediately found to be improper as soon as a larger rig is put on, and it took about two days of solid practicing to break that habit.


As soon as I put on a big rig it took me around three seconds to break that habit... :lol:
  • 0




PLC Electronics Solutions

Varizoom Follow Focus

rebotnix Technologies

Engineered Cinema Solutions

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

SkyDreams

IDX

Boland Communications

Wireless Video Systems

Teradek

Betz Tools for Stabilizers

PLC - Bartech

Paralinx LLC

GPI Pro Systems

Omnishot Systems

BOXX